Millions of Animals Have Died in Florence Flooding. End Factory Farming Now.

thepetitionsite.com

Thanks to industrial agriculture, a gruesome scene is unfolding in North Carolina where millions of drowned chickens, turkeys, and pigs are bobbing in the floodwaters surrounding factory farms. With hazardous weather conditions continuing, this toll is likely to rise.

It didn’t have to be this way.

Factory farms are a nightmare for everyone involved, from the animals housed there to the humans who work there. Chickens, pigs, and other animals are packed into tightly crowded barns and raised with minimal contact or affection. The sole goal is to fatten them up for market as quickly as possible with minimal “losses,” a clinical way to describe dead, downed, and ill animals.

Close conditions promote aggressive behaviors, foster the spread of disease, and lead workers to engage in cruel activities like debeaking chickens to reduce aggression. They also generate extremely large volumes of waste — before the storm, many were very worried about the manure lagoons where pig feces are stored, fearing (correctly) that they would rupture in floodwaters. The stench of factory farms can be unbearable, and the state legislature just passed a law making it harder for neighbors to take legal action.

For workers, being on a factory farm involves long, grueling hours with few employment protections, for extremely low pay. The money from the sales of animals at market doesn’t end up in the pockets of farmers, for the most part. It goes to the multinational companies they work for, like Pilgrim’s Pride and Foster Farms. Meanwhile, farmers may incur substantial debt as they make outlays of cash to invest in farming operations, running a risk of losing their farms if things go wrong.

With Florence, some farmers did try to evacuate livestock from low-lying areas — flooding of factory farms is a known issue. But they couldn’t move all their stock, and as a result, animals were left to drown in the waters. That’s not all, though. Some animals survived, but their farms were cut off, making it difficult to supply them with food, water, and other needs, with farmers fearing that their livestock may die before they can reach them.

We know that factory farms are bad for animals, bad for humans, and bad for the environment. And while some states have begun to pass legislation that covers specific aspects of factory farming cruelty — like laws mandating more space for laying hens or banning inhumane “gestation crates” for pigs — we need to think bigger.

What if we banned factory farming altogether, insisting on more humane conditions for farm animals and humans alike?

Tell the industry that we’re tired of the animal, environmental, and human costs of factory farming. It’s time for a meaningful alternative, and no more mass farm animal deaths in natural disasters.

https://www.thepetitionsite.com/175/413/963/millions-of-animals-have-died-in-florence-flooding.-end-factory-farming/

Photo credit: Farm Watch

Judge Jeanine GOES OFF on the Kavanaugh Accuser – Opening Statement 09/22/18

Kitten Reportedly Tied Up in Garbage Bag and Thrown in Dumpster Deserves Justice

A kitten was reportedly abandoned in a dumpster, struggling to fight for her life inside a sealed garbage bag. Demand justice for this poor abused animal.

Source: Kitten Reportedly Tied Up in Garbage Bag and Thrown in Dumpster Deserves Justice

Pregnant Cat Reportedly Burned to Death in Dryer Deserves Justice

A pregnant cat was reportedly sealed inside of a public dryer, leading to her painful and horrific death. CCTV footage shows two men placing the cat into the dryer and then later inserting coins to start the machine. Demand justice for this innocent cat.

Source: Pregnant Cat Reportedly Burned to Death in Dryer Deserves Justice

Dog Who Reportedly Died of Over-Heating at Groomer’s Deserves Justice

A dog died after a groomer reportedly left him unattended under a hot dryer. He was confined to a crate, police stated, and had a noose tied around his neck. Demand justice for this poor dog.

Source: Dog Who Reportedly Died of Over-Heating at Groomer’s Deserves Justice

Punish Former Animal Control Officer for Allegedly Breaking Dog’s Jaw

A former animal control officer allegedly caused a broken jaw and multiple fractures to her Pomeranian. Demand justice for this innocent dog.

Source: Punish Former Animal Control Officer for Allegedly Breaking Dog’s Jaw

Do Not Punish Woman for Rescuing Pets Stranded by Hurricane Florence

A woman may face charges for sheltering over two dozen pets in a warehouse space following the devastation caused by Hurricane Florence even though she did not have a license to do so. Urge North Carolina officials not to punish this woman for this selfless act of compassion.

Source: Do Not Punish Woman for Rescuing Pets Stranded by Hurricane Florence

Estranged Wife Accused of Burning Dog While Husband Served in Iraq Must be Punished

A dog named Denali was critically burned when a woman allegedly set her home on fire in a marital dispute. Apparently, the woman confined Denali in a room so she would be consumed in the fire, but miraculously she survived. However, she is now facing only a 50% chance of survival due to her injuries. Sign this petition to demand justice for Denali.

Source: Estranged Wife Accused of Burning Dog While Husband Served in Iraq Must be Punished

Petition: Oil tankers or orcas? Keep tar sand in the ground!

rainforest-rescue.org

Tankers carrying tar sand oil are a serious threat to the habitat of endangered orcas. Yet Alberta is planning the world’s largest open-pit tar sand mine. If realized, it would wipe out 292 square kilometers of forests and wetlands and be a disaster for the climate. Tell Canada to keep tar sand in the ground!

News and updates Call to action

To: Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, Minister of Environment and Climate Change Catherine McKenna

Teck Resources’ planned Frontier Tar Sand Mine would be an ecological disaster with a global impact. Keep tar sand in the ground.

Read letter

The pipelines needed to export tar sand oil are environmental disasters waiting to happen: the Trans Mountain Pipeline crosses the Rocky Mountains to British Columbia’s Pacific coast. Oil spills are virtually pre-programmed, and a tanker accident could devastate the coastline and the habitat of 75 endangered orcas.

Further inland, the tar sand mining industry is turning swathes of northern Alberta, Canada, into a wasteland: Forests are being felled to make way for open-pit mines. Tailing ponds contain water laden with heavy metals. Refineries pollute the air.

Tar sand oil is the world’s dirtiest fossil fuel, and extracting and refining it requires far greater amounts of energy than conventional oil. This project would make a mockery of Canada’s commitment to protect the climate – leaving it in the ground is the only sane option.

UNESCO is alarmed by the prospect of the mine: the guardians of World Heritage Sites see grave danger for Wood Buffalo National Park at the mouth of Athabasca River. The river is already polluted by existing oil sand mines and its condition would become much worse.

Local people are also impacted by the environmental destruction. The Mikisew Cree and Athabasca Chipewyan First Nations reject the project and have declared the land north of Firebag River to be a no-go area. This has not stopped the mining company from running roughshod over the rights of the indigenous peoples.

There will be an official hearing for the pipeline project at the end of September. Together with our Canadian partners, we want to bring international pressure to bear against the dirtiest fossil fuel on the planet. Please sign our petition: Tell the Canadian government to keep tar sand in the ground!

Back­ground
Canada’s boreal forests

Canada’s forests cover an area of 347 million hectares. Of those, 270 million hectares are boreal coniferous forests. Only Russia and Brazil have more forest. 94 percent of all forests in Canada are on public land. Politicians have a great influence over whether they are protected or open to exploitation by business.

The boreal forests of pine, spruce, fir and larch are the habitat of caribou, wolves and numerous bird species. Countless lakes, rivers and mountain ranges form a diverse mosaic of natural spaces. The forests are also a crucial bulwark against climate change, storing twice as much carbon as tropical forests.

Between 1990 and 2015, Canada’s forest area decreased by 1.2 million hectares, mainly due to logging, mining and hydropower projects. In many cases, the ecological impact is greater than the immediate physical one. For example, relatively narrow strips of land are cleared for roads, but caribou generally do not cross them and thus lose large parts of their habitat. They also keep at least 500 meters away from any disturbances of their environment. While the tar sands themselves cover an area of 475,000 hectares, their full exploitation would thus impact an area of 12,5 million hectares.
Wood Buffalo National Park in danger

At 44,807 square kilometers, Wood Buffalo National Park is Canada’s largest national park and largest UNESCO World Heritage Site. It also encompasses the world’s largest inland delta at the mouths of the Peace and Athabasca rivers.

Wood Buffalo National Park was established in 1922 declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1983.

UNESCO describes the protected area as “the most ecologically complete and largest example of the entire Great Plains-Boreal grassland ecosystem of North America, the only place where the predator-prey relationship between wolves and wood bison has continued, unbroken, over time”.

The national park is also the only breeding habitat in the world for the endangered whooping crane (Grus americana). Experts estimate the population to be no more than 250 adult individuals.
Canada’s oil reserves

Canada’s tar sand deposits underlie more than 140,000 square kilometers of northeastern Alberta – an area larger than England. The country’s oil reserves are estimated at 170 billion barrels, putting it in second place after Saudi Arabia.

In 2016, Canada produced 2.8 million barrels of crude oil a day, 2.4 million of which come from tar sands. Current plans are to boost production to 5.1 million barrels a day by 2030, with 3.7 million from tar sands.
Three tons of sand – one barrel of oil

Tar sand is often called “oil sand”, a misleading term that trivializes the harmful chemical process required to extract oil from the bitumen in the sand. Two to three tons of sand are needed to obtain just one barrel of oil (159 liters). Processing the sand consumes up to five times more energy than the extraction of conventional oil. The fuel also emits 23 percent more greenhouse gases.

According to the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers (CAPP), 12 billion barrels of tar sand oil have been extracted since 1967. As a result, 6.3 gigatons of carbon dioxide have been released into the atmosphere.

Strip mining tar sand not only devastates vast swathes of land, it also causes serious water pollution on a large scale. The contents of the tailing ponds, which presently cover 176 square kilometers, could bury London under a layer of toxic sludge nearly one meter deep. The muck contains heavy metals such as lead, mercury and arsenic, as well as carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. A study by the University of Toronto has shown that up to 1,000 times more toxins evaporate from the ponds than previously assumed. According to the Pembina Institute, 11 million liters of the toxic brew seep into the groundwater and pollute the Athabasca River every single day.
Athabasca River polluted

Fish in the Athabasca river and delta show striking deformations. Among the indigenous Mikisew Cree First Nation living downstream, certain cancers occur at up to seven times the national average rate. Locals in the town of Fort Chipewyan put the numerous deaths down to heavy metals in the environment. The Canadian government does not see a connection. Critics have described the government’s cavalier attitude toward the plight of the indigenous peoples as racist.

To date, the United States has been the main consumer of Canadian oil. Demand is falling, however. The U.S. has been pushing the extraction of oil and gas via fracking with the aim of becoming independent of foreign oil, a policy that has received added impetus under President Donald Trump.
Oil pipelines crossing the continent

Canada is planning major pipelines to transport the crude oil.

The Trans Mountain Expansion Project of the Kinder Morgan Pipeline has already been approved and is supported by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. The pipeline links Alberta’s oil fields to the Pacific Coast. However, the provincial government of British Columbia is trying to foil the construction with proposed environmental regulations.

The Enbridge Line 3 pipeline, which will head south toward the U.S., has already been approved. The planned 2,700 km Keystone XL pipeline would also link Canada’s tar sand fields to refineries in Texas.

The oil industry has been calling for a pipeline to the east to export tar sand oil to Europe. In late 2017, however, the TransCanada group bowed to public pressure and dropped its Energy East project to the Atlantic coast.

Letter

To: Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, Minister of Environment and Climate Change Catherine McKenna

Dear Prime Minister,
Dear Minister McKenna,

Canada is among the countries with the most extensive forests on the planet. The old-growth rainforests of British Columbia, the maple tree forest in Quebec, and the boreal forests in the North are habitat for countless plant and animal species. The forests and wetlands store huge amounts of carbon and play an important role in mitigating climate change on a global scale.

It is crucial that Canada protect its forests – yet you have not been living up to this responsibility.

The tar sand areas in Alberta are the most horrible and obvious example of this lack of responsibility. For many years, vast forest and wetlands areas have been destroyed for open-pit mines and the production of the dirtiest fossil oil in the world. The Athabasca river has been poisoned, caribou and bear habitat has been destroyed and First Nations rights have been violated.

Teck Recourse’s proposed Frontier tar sand mine would damage Canada’s climate change commitments. From the year 2026 on, Teck plans to produce 260,000 barrels oil per day – over the course of 50 years. The approval of this new project would perpetuate the burning of fossil fuels despite the urgent need for humanity to switch to renewable energy as soon as possible to avoid further damage to the climate.

Furthermore, the tar sand mine project would be harmful to the habitat of significant plant and animal species, to the Athabasca River and other water resources, and to the Wood Buffalo National Park UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Considering the existing and potential damage and harm, we ask you kindly to:

  • stop Teck Resource’s proposed Frontier tar sand mine and tar sand exploitation in general.
  • stop the construction of oil pipelines like Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain that are connected with tar sand exploitation.
  • protect the Wood Buffalo National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • protect Canada’s forests, wetlands, rivers and lakes.
  • respect the rights of First Nations and Métis communities who oppose tar sand mining and oil pipelines.

Your government was praised during the Bonn climate summit when announcing an end to burning coal. That pledge would be hypocritical, however, if you continue keep supporting tar sand exploitation. Canada can neither achieve its climate targets under the Paris Agreement nor its national climate plan if it exploits tar sand further.

Please live up to your responsibility to protect Canada’s forest and the global climate: keep tar sand in the ground!

Yours faithfully,

https://www.rainforest-rescue.org/petitions/1128/oil-tankers-or-orcas-keep-tar-sand-in-the-ground?mtu=356307983&t=3966

Dry Storage and Transportation of High Burnup Spent Nuclear Fuel – Comment Deadline Monday Night 11.59 PM Eastern (There Was Less Than 2 Months For Comments – Request Extension)

Mining Awareness +

This is a life and death important topic for future generations, as well as our own. And, the US NRC has given less than 2 months to comment on a 129 page document. Only 2 people have commented. Many have not heard. Please comment, spread the word, and ask for an extension to this deadline. We put some related information and the link for comments below. It’s easy and can be anonymous. You can, for instance, read a piece of the document and comment on that, while asking for an extension.

Introduction Loads on Fuel Rods, Billone 2013

HBU is High Burnup Nuclear Fuel.
Dry Storage and Transportation of High Burnup Spent Nuclear Fuel

This Notice document was issued by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)
Action Draft NUREG; request for comment.
Summary
The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is issuing for public comment a draft NUREG, NUREG-2224, “Dry Storage…

View original post 297 more words