WAN Exclusive For International Assistance Dog Week with “Dogs Of Service” Founder Saralyn Tartaglia Who Helps Rescue Dogs For Military Veterans – World Animal News

By Lauren Lewis –
August 9, 2018
Air Force veteran Eric Pina with his family which now includes his service dog, Loki. Photos from Dogs of Service.
With so much negative attention focused on service animals as of late, WAN is thrilled to acknowledge International Assistance Dog Week by featuring a unique and much-needed non-profit organization dedicated to providing service dogs and emotional support animals that have been rescued to help military veterans.
International Assistance Dog Week, which was created to recognize all the devoted, hardworking assistance dogs helping individuals mitigate their disability related limitations, began on August 5th and runs through August 11th.
Fortunately, Los Angeles-based Dogs of Service makes rescue dogs and veterans in need, a priority every day, as it works to maintain a community of support and resources for all military members and their animals.
“We chose to focus on veterans because there was a great need for innovative solutions to help veterans dealing with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and traumatic brain injuries. Sadly, the average suicide rate of veterans is 22 per day. Veterans and dogs can find a mutual understanding and provide a sense of comfort other humans can’t, and that relationship can be used to bridge further healing and treatment,” Dogs of Service Founder Saralyn Tartaglia told WAN. Further explaining that it is important that the organization, which is authorized to pull animals from city shelters, only pairs veterans with dogs who have been rescued from shelters.
“We love the unspoken understanding and bond that happens when a veteran meets a rescue dog, it’s amazing. We were inspired by the ability of rescue dogs to sense emotions and be compassionate,” continued Tartaglia. “I started this organization because veterans have made many sacrifices, so this is our way to give back to them.”

Most recently, Dogs of Service paired Air Force veteran Eric Pina, who suffers from PTSD, with a new service dog that will be trained to help him. As per Tartaglia, a service dog can provide support and comfort to help its person push through difficult situations to make progress.
“The dogs we were looking at for Eric and his family just were not working out; then this puppy walked into the shelter on her own and literally checked herself in. After a meeting, it was clear she was the dog for them. She was even playing with lil Eric,” Dogs of Service posted on its Facebook page noting they will train the dog, now named Loki, to be a PTSD service dog for Eric.
“Dogs of Service connected me with not only a service dog but a loyal friend that has become my family,” shared Pena.
Having to care for a dog also gives many people a sense of purpose that enables them to “get up every morning to be part of the world,” said Tartaglia who shared that the routine the dog sets can also be helpful to maintain a healthy and consistent lifestyle.
“On the downside, because of all the negative attention and lack of knowledge about service dogs and emotional support animals, it has become a struggle for many veterans to go out in public or travel with their dog,” Tartaglia told WAN. “Veterans are being pressed for details about their dogs, bullied out of housing, being forced to adhere to illegal requirements, and having to deal with untrained fake service dogs in public spaces that may put real service dogs and their handlers at risk.
The American Disabilities Act (ADA) has defined a service dog as one that has been individually trained to do work or perform tasks for an individual with a disability. The tasks performed by the dog must be directly related to the person’s disability.
ADA guidelines in regard to service dogs are written loosely to enable all people to have access to a service dog: it does not discriminate in regard to “finances, location, type of disability, and access to urban areas.
It is important to note, as per Tartaglia, that many people do not understand that the ADA only covers public spaces; it does not cover housing, airports, trains and flights.
Tartaglia also encourages people to be wary of any online registry offering service dog certification and ID Cards, because service dogs and emotional support animals do not need to be registered or certified in any way.
“Having a service dog is a choice to be made with medical and care providers, it is a big responsibility and undertaking, but for some people, it can be life-changing,” continued Tartaglia, noting that service dog costs can range anywhere from $5000.00 to $25,000.00 with owner trained service dogs being on the low-end.
Dogs of Service currently offers weekly service dog training classes in Sherman Oaks, California, and is looking to expand into the Santa Clarita Valley, and possibly the South Bay, with more classes in 2019.
The classes are designed to teach dogs the vital socialization skills they need while also allowing veterans to connect and interact with each other.

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Dogs of Service has an application process so that they can figure out what the veteran needs and find a dog that is the best fit for them and their life.
Tartaglia also often helps veterans navigate the legal side, as well as ensuring that they can have dogs in their residences and assisting them with travel guidelines. To ensure a good pairing, Dogs of Service works with behaviorists and trainers for training to ensure that the veterans can learn how best to work with their dogs.

https://worldanimalnews.com/wan-exclusive-for-international-assistance-dog-week-with-dogs-of-service-founder-saralyn-tartaglia-who-helps-rescue-dogs-for-military-veterans/

© Copyright 2018 – WorldAnimalNews.com

Breaking! Colorado State University Withdraws From Plan With BLM To Conduct Surgical Sterilization Experiments On Wild Horses – World Animal News

By WAN –
August 9, 2018

Following substantial public outcry, Colorado State University (CSU) announced yesterday that it was withdrawing from a joint plan with the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to conduct surgical sterilization experiments on wild horses.
More than 10,000 citizens, including numerous equine veterinarians, joined the American Wild Horse Campaign (AWHC), the Animal Welfare Institute (AWI), and other humane and horse advocacy organizations in opposing the proposed mare sterilization research.
The withdrawal of CSU from the experiments strikes a major blow to the BLM’s plan to round up by helicopter all wild horses in the Warm Springs Herd Management Area, and then force 100 of the captured mares to undergo ovariectomies via colpotomy—a particularly dangerous surgical procedure in which a mare’s ovaries are severed and pulled out while the animal remains conscious.
Since the wild horses cannot be handled, they would not be provided with the required post-operative care, including restricted movement, adequate pain relief, and antibiotic treatment for infections. Shockingly, part of the stated experimental goal is to quantify how many pregnant mares would abort foals as a result of the procedure.
“CSU made the right decision to listen to veterinarians and the public and dissociate itself from these inhumane and barbaric wild horse sterilization experiments,” Brieanah Schwartz, AWHC government relations and policy council said in a statement. “There is a way to manage wild horses and removing the ovaries of wild mares is not it. It’s time for the BLM to stop wasting tax dollars and start following the advice of the National Academy of Sciences to manage horses humanely on the range using the proven PZP birth control vaccine.”
In 2016, the BLM proposed similar mare sterilization experiments in conjunction with Oregon State University, but canceled them after massive public opposition and a lawsuit filed by AWHC and The Cloud Foundation. This summer, the agency revived the proposal, partnering with CSU.
Last week, AWHC and AWI submitted extensive comments outlining the numerous ethical, constitutional, legal, and scientific problems with the new proposal. The groups notified the agency that they would pursue legal action if necessary to halt the experiments and protect these animals from abuse.
“We commend Colorado State University for reconsidering the decision to work with the BLM on this bizarre and barbaric plan that would subject wild horses to risky, inhumane and unnecessary sterilization surgeries,” said Dr. Joanna Grossman, AWI’s equine program manager. “Advocates across the country made it abundantly clear that using federally protected wild horses as test subjects is ethically and legally unjustifiable. Our hope is that the BLM will recognize that any effort to ovariectomize wild mares is toxic and must not move forward.”
AWI and AWHC are urging the BLM to permanently drop plans to conduct the ovariectomy via colpotomy procedure on wild mares.

https://worldanimalnews.com/breaking-colorado-state-university-withdraws-from-plan-with-blm-to-conduct-surgical-sterilization-experiments-on-wild-horses/

© Copyright 2018 – WorldAnimalNews.com

This Dog Survived But Serves As Warning Why People Should Never Give An Animal Away “Free To A Good Home” – World Animal News

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By Lauren Lewis –
July 23, 2018

An animal shelter in Brisbane, Australia, is warning people not to give away pets, especially for free via social media. Sadly, an innocent puppy with severe facial injuries serves as an example of why.
“Trixie is a young, loving six-month-old pup who has already seen the absolute horrors this world has to offer. Her old owner couldn’t care for her so gave her away on a Facebook page to what he thought was a ‘good home’,” Happy Tails Animal Rescue posted on its Facebook page. “The disgusting humans who posed as a ‘good home’ promptly blocked Trixie’s old owner so he couldn’t check in on her… and two weeks passed by before Trixie showed up at the local pound with horrific facial injuries.”
A photo released by the rescue reveals that the sweet little Rottweiler and staffie mix with a swollen face had been used as a ‘bait dog’ to train fighting dogs.

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The post revealed that after hearing about Trixie’s story, the rescue organization picked the dog up from the pound and then drove her six hours away to the shelter in Brisbane.
While the swelling on her face has gone down, the rescue reported that there is still a lot of scarring.

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“Trixie is looking for a FOSTER HOME, preferably with NO other animals as she has endured so much pain and needs to recover in a quiet environment where she can learn that humans will never hurt her again,” the post continued. “If you can help give this pup another chance at life, one without pain and horror but just love and guidance, please let us know ASAP!”
“Also, please remember if you have absolutely no choice and need to rehome your pet, always go through a rescue group or shelter,” advised the rescue group. “You never can be sure who you are giving your precious pet to otherwise!”
As of this morning, a new update on Trixie, who is responding well to treatment, has been posted explaining that the RSPCA is now investigating her alleged mistreatment.
Fortunately, Trixie has since been placed in a loving foster home.

https://worldanimalnews.com/this-dog-survived-but-serves-as-warning-why-you-should-never-give-an-animal-away-free-to-a-good-home/

© Copyright 2018 – WorldAnimalNews.com

‘Naval sonar’ could have caused deaths of whales (with our money !) washed ashore in Donegal (Ireland)

The ocean update

Picture by Gareth and Amanda Doherty

August 8th, 2018. NAVAL sonar could have caused the deaths of whales that washed ashore in Co Donegal, it has been claimed.

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Orca mother still carrying dead calf, marking 16th day of ‘tour of grief’ (West coast, Canada, USA)

The ocean update

A mother orca carries her dead newborn. Several species of whales show signs of mourning. Photograph by Robin Baird, Cascadia Research

August 8th, 2018 (Brett Cihon, Simone Del Rosario). FRIDAY HARBOR, Wash. — A southern resident orca mother is still carrying her dead and decomposing calf, more than two weeks after she was first spotted holding on to her offspring.

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Brian Ladoon, saviour of Canadian Eskimo Dogs, has died in Churchill

polarbearscience

Early on Sunday 5 August 2018, Brian Ladoon died at the age of 65 in Churchill, Manitoba — and so far, the media have said nothing. Brian dedicated his life to the preservation of the Canadian Eskimo Dog — which often attracted polar bears to his property — but he was also an accomplished artist.

Ladoon and husky_Norbert Rosing obituary 6 Aug 2018 In the early days, (Norbert Rosing photo.

As a lover of Arctic dogs, I remember hearing of Brian’s work decades ago but only that “someone” was working hard to save the breed. I never dreamed I’d come to know so much more about his work through my research on polar bear ecology and evolution.

I never met the man. But he has clearly been an icon of Churchill for decades and because of that, the place will not be the same without him. He is on the right in the photo below, for the TV…

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