BLM is considering shipping America’s wild horses to Guyana to an area with jaguars, and to a Siberian tiger refuge in Russia to be used as prey

Straight from the Horse's Heart

A couple of notes to preface the Huffington Post article below:

Regarding Russian-American company OOO Rancho Khasan: “On Nov. 1, Anatoli Lebedev, the organization’s co-founder, wrote: ‘[F]or marketing we need a very clear picture ― how are we able to extract some horses for meat from the whole herd … without hurting hearts of animal rights activists, who trusted us?’”

Regarding the area in Guyana where the BLM is considering shipping America’s wild horses (click to enlarge):

Is this how our wild horses will be treated once “adopted,” and shipped overseas out of BLM’s jurisdiction?

Source:  Huffington Post

Feds Weigh Proposals To Ship Wild Horses Overseas

As officials explore options to manage the population, horse advocates fear relocation could lead to animals being slaughtered.

Jim Urquhart / Reuters Wild horses stand in a corral as the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) gathers the horses near the Sulphur…

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Upcoming Featured Series About Woman in Wolf Advocacy

Wolves of Douglas County News

Woman are leading the charge in wolf & wildlife advocacy. Throughout the United States we’re seeing more woman working to change the paradigm in wildlife conservation. These woman have become leaders in creating nonprofits, non lethal workshops, producing documentary films and the fine arts. Woman are speaking up and demanding change in the way we manage our wild sentient-beings and these strong voices are being heard.

That’s woman-power as we called it in the sixties! Wolves of Douglas County Wisconsin salutes woman wolf & Wildlife leaders, and will be doing featured interviews in a series about woman in Wildlife advocacy.

Stay tuned for more to come…

Featured photograph is from Apex Protection Project Paula Ficara one of the founders.

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Take Action Now:Protect Endangered Species | Ocean Conservancy

takeaction.oceanconservancy.org
Take Action Now | Ocean Conservancy
Protect Endangered Species

Heartbreaking Truth: Countless marine species are in real, grave danger of becoming extinct.

Could you imagine a world where children only read about whales and sea turtles in science books on natural history, aligning them with such long-gone species as the dinosaurs?

We can’t either, and luckily, that’s where the Endangered Species Act (ESA) comes in.

The Endangered Species Act is critical to keeping our nation’s most threatened marine wildlife safe from harm. But now, there are talks that the law’s very existence could be at stake. Write to your Members of Congress today and let them know you support the critical protections the ESA provides for our ocean’s most vulnerable animals.

Take action today and let them know you mean business: the ESA has got to stay. Far too many species, from innocent baby turtles to whales and more, depend on it for their ultimate survival. Let’s make sure our children, and our children’s children, are all able to see an ocean as filled with vibrant wildlife as so many people seem to take for granted today.

Will you speak up for the ESA?

Take action…our ocean is counting on you.

https://takeaction.oceanconservancy.org/page/25203/action/1?ea.tracking.id=18LPFCBAXX&utm_medium=email&utm_source=engagingnetworks&utm_campaign=endangeredspeciesact0618&utm_content=20180604+-+Endangered+Species+Act+-+Prospects+-+Email+1+-+18LPFCBAXX

In male dolphin alliances, ‘everybody knows your name’ — ScienceDaily

sciencedaily.com
In male dolphin alliances, ‘everybody knows your name’ — ScienceDaily
Jonathon Goodman,
3-4 minutes

It’s not uncommon in dolphin society for males to form long-lasting alliances with other males, sometimes for decades. Now, after studying bottlenose dolphins in Shark Bay, Australia, for more than 30 years, researchers reporting in Current Biology on June 7 find that these males retain individual vocal labels rather than sharing a common call with their cooperative partners.

“We found that male bottlenose dolphins that form long-term cooperative partnerships or alliances with one another retain individual vocal labels, or ‘names,’ which allows them to recognize many different friends and rivals in their social network,” says Stephanie King (@_StephanieLKing) from the University of Western Australia. “Our work shows that these ‘names’ help males keep track of their many different relationships: who are their friends, who are their friend’s friends, and who are their competitors.”

In the new study, King and colleagues set out to better understand what role vocal communication plays in coordinating complex social behaviors, including cooperation, in bottlenose dolphins. The researchers knew from years of study that male bottlenose dolphins form long-term cooperative alliances with one another. However, they did not know how these males used vocal signals to form and maintain these relationships.

To explore the role of vocal signals, they recorded the dolphins’ vocalizations using underwater microphones and determined the individual vocal label used by each of the males. They then measured the similarity of those identity signals within and between alliances to find out whether males with stronger social relationships used vocal labels that were more similar.

“We wanted to understand if allied male dolphins converged onto similar calls as a way of advertising their alliance membership, or whether they retained individual vocal labels,” King explains.

The analysis showed that males in an alliance retain vocal labels that are quite distinct from one another, suggesting that those calls serve a purpose similar to an individual name. That’s in contrast to findings in many other species where individuals with close relationships converge on shared vocalizations as a way of advertising their membership to that partnership or group.

“With male bottlenose dolphins, it’s the opposite — each male retains a unique call, even though they develop incredibly strong bonds with one another,” King says. “Therefore, retaining individual ‘names’ is more important than sharing calls for male dolphins, allowing them to keep track of or maintain a fascinating social network of cooperative relationships.”

King says they will now study the males’ relationships with one another more closely. They’ll play the “names” of individual males back to each other and explore how males respond to members of their alliances in different contexts.

“It will be interesting to reveal whether all cooperative relationships within alliances are equal or not,” she says.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/06/180607112756.htm

Story Source:

Materials provided by Cell Press. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.

Petition · Fort Worth City Council: Horse Drawn Carriage Regulations in Fort Worth to Protect Horses in Temperature Extremes · Change.org

Brandi Cole started this petition to Fort Worth City Council

I witnessed obvious animal cruelty in Fort Worth on June 2, 2018, at a popular tourist destination. It was 102 degrees with a heat index of 113 and there was a heat advisory. There were horses pulling carts full of tourists with no immediate access to water or adequate shade. The horses were not rested between tours, as far as I could tell. They were overheated, exhausted, and overworked. Fort Worth currently does not have any rules that protect the horses during temperature extremes.

Obviously, we have very hot summers in North Texas. I want to ensure that the working animals (specifically horses pulling carriages) are treated humanely at all times but especially during temperature extremes. Several cities have recently placed regulations on the horse carriages including San Antonio, Charleston SC, Savannah GA, New York City, and Chicago.

I’m not opposed to working animals and I’m not asking to have the carts banned indefinitely; I am respectfully requesting that the City of Fort Worth enact regulations to ensure working horses (and all animals) are treated humanely at all times.

Fort Worth (and other North Texas cities) need regulations regarding temperature extremes immediately. At the very least, animals need immediate access to water at all times, adequate shade, and mandatory rest between tours.

Let’s follow Savannah Georgia’s example and put policies in place to protect carriage horses in extreme weather.

https://www.change.org/p/fort-worth-city-council-horse-drawn-carriage-regulations-in-fort-worth-to-protect-horses-in-temperature-extremes?source_location=petition_footer&algorithm=promoted&original_footer_petition_id=13250402&grid_position=6&pt=AVBldGl0aW9uAP5TygAAAAAAWx7WJw1FH7Q5ZmZmYzU0Yg%3D%3D

Petition · Send Asha the African Elephant to Sanctuary · Change.org

Voices for Asha started this petition to Mark Herring and 3 others

Asha, a 35-year-old female, African elephant has been alone at the Natural Bridge Zoo in Virginia for an accumulative 22 years. She is forced to give over 10,000 rides a year, despite active tuberculosis findings in monkeys held at the zoo. This is a huge risk to the public who are in close proximity to her on a daily basis. Her toenails are cracked due to lack of foot care, and the zoo has been cited for failing to provide adequate veterinary care across the board. These are just a handful of the issues she faces on a daily basis.

In April 2015, the Natural Bridge Zoo’s permit to publicly exhibit wild animals was suspended by the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries (DGIF). The zoo has since reopened despite numerous, ongoing complaints and inspections.

To call this zoo anything short of a roadside attraction would be an injustice to those animals who have suffered and died during the many decades it’s been allowed to operate. The zoo has made it in the list of top 10 Worst Zoos for Elephants by In Defense of Animals for the last four years, and after public pressure and undercover footage from the Humane Society of the United States was released, the zoo has been cited uncountable times by the USDA for issues including, but not limited to, contaminated food, sanitation issues, rodent infestation, and improper containment.

Due to the nature of these citations and disregard of many of them, we are asking that the DGIF step up and take permanent action. The DGIF has fallen short in assisting the USDA despite the fact that these issues are entirely within their jurisdiction. We ask the Attorney General to hold the DGIF accountable to taking appropriate action. Please consider sending Asha to a sanctuary, revoking the zoo’s license permanently, and finding placement for the zoo’s remaining animals that will meet their needs as a species.

https://www.change.org/p/send-asha-the-african-elephant-to-sanctuary?source_location=petition_footer&algorithm=promoted&original_footer_petition_id=3723388&grid_position=11&pt=AVBldGl0aW9uAGIvygAAAAAAWx7VobrG1PxlNjYxZjM3OA%3D%3D

Petition · Save Ely, the Sick and Abused Elephant City Governor – Miguel Angel Mancera Espinosa, You Can Save Her Life! · Change.org

Immediate Action To Be Taken On Behalf Of Ely An Abused And Neglected Elephant
OneProtest started this petition to Mexico City Governor Miguel Angel Mancera Espinosa and 4 others

A total of 3 elephants have died at The San Juan de Aragon Zoo. Maggie, an Asian elephant being the latest. Maggie was euthanized after suffering from degenerative osteoarthritis. Ely could be next on the list of dead elephants at San Juan de Aragon Zoo if nothing is done to help her. It is important to note that every animal at the San Juan de Aragon Zoo is insured and upon the animal’s death the zoo receives compensation.

We are calling for the immediate and prompt surrender of Ely, a female African elephant that is being held at the San Juan de Aragon Zoo.

Ely is a former circus elephant who was bought by the Aragon Zoo. The Zoo proclaims they’re treating Ely better than the circus, yet upon her arrival in 2012, her health and well-being has continually deteriorated. Her enclosure is made of concrete floors causing joint pain and pales in comparison to the vast lands she would roam in the wild. Elephants in the wild travel 15 – 30 miles a day, and for Ely to achieve this she would have to walk the back and forth in her enclosure over 300 and times a day. Due to confinement and the unnatural environment, Ely is forced to live in; she exhibits stereotyping a neurological condition conducive to animals held in captivity.

Ely suffers from a broad spectrum of health issues, among those issues is a skin condition known as ulcerative dermatitis. The lack of shade in Ely’s enclosure has caused her to become severely sunburnt on top of her already damaged skin. The lack of care and treatment to these injuries has resulted in an infection that is most visible on her back.

We demand swift action be taken in regards to the treatment of Ely. We urge San Juan de Aragon Zoo to release Ely to a sanctuary that can provide her with the love and care; she so desperately needs and deserves.

https://www.change.org/p/save-ely-the-sick-and-abused-elephant-city-governor-miguel-angel-mancera-espinosa-you-can-save-her-life

 

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