Petition: Tourist Steals Dying Dolphin From Beach

by: Care2 Team
target: Yangjiang City Police

37,309 SUPPORTERS
40,000 GOAL

As the small dolphin lay suffering on the shore, a man approached. But he didn’t help the beached animal — instead he did something far worse.

The male tourist, dressed only in black swimming trucks, was filmed by shocked beachgoers picking up and throwing the dying dolphin over his shoulder. The man even seems to smile at the horrified onlookers as he walks off with the dolphin slung over his shoulder. He is then seen taking the dolphin to his car and speeding off.

Sign and share this petition to demand that local authorities find this man and charge him to fullest extent of the law for this cruel and illegal act!

The video was taken at Hailing Island off the coast of Yangjiang City in southern China and the unidentified man is still at large. The poor dolphin’s fate is unknown.

In the wild, dolphins are very social and emotionally sensitive animals. Their intelligence has been described by scientists to be on par with great apes and human toddlers. It’s unconscionable that this man would treat this helpless dolphin so cruelly — committing it to a painful death while he callously collects the animal like a souvenir.

Join the global call for Yangjiang City Police to treat this case as seriously as possible. This tourist needs to be found, investigated, and charged for this horrific act of abuse!

https://www.thepetitionsite.com/221/043/938/tourist-steals-dying-dolphin-from-beach/

Copyright © 2018 Care2.com, inc. and its licensors. All rights reserved

Justice Must Be Served After Man Heartlessly Carries Stranded Dolphin Off Of A Beach In South China – World Animal News

Justice Must Be Served After Man Heartlessly Carries Stranded Dolphin Off Of A Beach In South China
By WAN – May 4, 2018

Police are looking for a man who was filmed callously carrying a stranded dolphin off of a beach in southern China.
The horrifying footage, taken at popular tourist destination Hailing Island in Guangdong province, was reportedly filmed during China’s three-day labor holiday on May 1st.
According to Channel News Asia, the man picked up the dolphin, which appeared to be lifeless, and swung it over his shoulder before driving away with it in a car.
As per China’s Law of Wildlife Protection, dolphins are one of the species that citizens are not allowed to hunt, kill, sell, or keep, even if the mammals are found dead.
“Dolphins are protected animals in China,” an official stated after the local fisheries bureau launched an investigation. “Whether it is dead or alive, it is wrong to take it away. He should have called the authorities to deal with the matter.”
“Is he going to boil the dolphin,” questioned one person, “This is simply disgusting.”
Local officials have confirmed that the man could face criminal charges for his action.
Could? He absolutely Should!
WAN will continue to update this story as it develops.

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http://worldanimalnews.com/justice-must-be-served-after-man-heartlessly-carries-stranded-dolphin-off-of-a-beach-in-south-china/

© Copyright 2016 – WorldAnimalNews.com

Heartbreaking News! South African Cinematographer Carlos Carvalho Passes Away Following Tragic Incident With Giraffe – World Animal News

Heartbreaking News! South African Cinematographer Carlos Carvalho Passes Away Following Tragic Incident With Giraffe
By Lauren Lewis – May 7, 2018

WAN joins the countless people worldwide who are mourning the passing of award-winning South African cinematographer Carlos Carvalho.
Tragically, Carvalho was attacked by a giraffe while on assignment at the Glen Afric Country Lodge near Pretoria, the capital of South Africa.
“It is with a very sad heart that we have to announce the passing of Carlos Carvalho, one of our favorite DOP’s,” filming company CallaCrew announced on its Facebook page on Thursday, one day after the tragic incident. “Carlos was filming a feature at Glen Afric and had a fatal run-in with a giraffe on set.”
Carvalho had been flown by helicopter to Netcare Milpark Hospital in Johannesburg, where he later succumbed to his head injuries.
The 47-year-old filmmaker was reportedly shooting close-ups of Gerald, the giraffe, when the animal was spooked by the boom swinger and swung his neck hitting Carvalho against his head.

“When Carlos was standing in front of the giraffe, the animal spread its legs, bent its neck and swung its head at Carlos,” Richard Brooker, whose family owns the lodge told Netwerk24. He further explained that Gerald will remain at the property. “He did nothing wrong.”
The British television series “Wild at Heart” was filmed at Glen Afric Country Lodge, which on its website shares that tourists can “get up close and personal to a number of our resident wildlife.
This incident raises the question of whether wild animals should be used for the purpose of filmed entertainment.
“Our thoughts and condolences are with Carlos’ family and friends during this very sad time, CallaCrew concluded. “He will be sorely missed.”
R.I.P. Carlos

Help us continue to bring you the latest breaking animal news from around the world and consider making a Donation Here! http://www.peace4animals.net/donate

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“One Person CAN Make A Difference”

http://worldanimalnews.com/heartbreaking-news-south-african-cinematographer-carlos-carvalho-passes-away-following-tragic-incident-with-giraffe/

© Copyright 2016 – WorldAnimalNews.com

WAN’s Most Wanted: Help Needed To Identify Man Who Harassed Moose In Colorado – World Animal News

WAN’s Most Wanted: Help Needed To Identify Man Who Harassed Moose In Colorado
By WAN -May 7, 2018

Colorado Parks and Wildlife is requesting that the public help identify a man pictured on social media standing within a few feet of an angry moose along a busy stretch of road in Frisco, Colorado.
According to a witness, he and his passenger observed the man chase the moose onto the median Friday afternoon in the 900 block of 10 Mile Drive in Frisco. They were able to snap a photo of the incident as they drove past the man and the agitated animal.
“It is very evident from the photo that the moose is angry, and the man could easily have been attacked and injured, or possibly killed,” District Wildlife Manager Elissa Slezak of Summit County said in a statement yesterday. “You can clearly see that the moose’s ears are pinned back and its hackles are raised. It is likely this person does not realize how much danger he put himself in, or maybe he does not care.”
Colorado Parks and Wildlife officials stress that moose do not attack people unprovoked; however, they will defend themselves very aggressively if threatened or harassed. Moose do not fear people and will stand their ground, giving the impression they are tolerant of a human’s presence.
“I strongly advise against approaching these animals,” said Slezak. “They can weigh up to 1000 pounds, can run much faster than humans, and possess a strong instinct for self-preservation.”
Slezak noted that the individual in the photo will likely be cited for harassment of wildlife if he is identified, but the bigger concern is making sure the individual does not repeat the behavior.
Anyone with information can remain anonymous by calling Operation Game Thief at 877-265-6648 or emailing game.thief@state.co.us.
Reward available if information given leads to an arrest or citation.

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http://worldanimalnews.com/wans-most-wanted-help-needed-to-identify-man-who-harassed-moose-in-colorado/

© Copyright 2016 – WorldAnimalNews.com

Tiger Cub Found in Duffel Bag Deserves Justice

A two-month-old tiger cub was found unconscious in a duffel bag. Although the cub is safe, he is now living in a zoo. Demand the young tiger is sent to a sanctuary in order to get the freedom he deserves.

Source: Tiger Cub Found in Duffel Bag Deserves Justice

Vet Accused of Smuggling Heroin Inside Puppies’ Stomachs Must be Punished

Innocent puppies were reportedly used as drug carriers by a vet who surgically implanted liquid heroin inside their bellies. Demand that this man be severely punished if found guilty of this heinous crime.

Source: Vet Accused of Smuggling Heroin Inside Puppies’ Stomachs Must be Punished

When will sardines return? Not any time soon say scientists

By Annie Roth, newsroom@montereyherald.com

Neil Guglielmo, a 76-year-old commercial fisherman, says he doubts the sardine stock will bounce back in his lifetime. (Annie Roth — Herald Correspondent)
Neil Guglielmo, a 76-year-old commercial fisherman, says he doubts the sardine stock will bounce back in his lifetime. (Annie Roth — Herald Correspondent)

Monterey >> Less than 30 years after the Pacific sardine population was deemed “recovered,” the stock has once again fallen into a severe slump according to stock assessments conducted by the National Marine Fisheries Service.

Scientists estimate the West Coast population of Pacific sardines has declined by 95 percent since 2006. Although sardine populations naturally fluctuate in response to shifting climatic conditions, overharvesting is believed to have accelerated the stock’s collapse. Although no one knows exactly how long it will take for the sardine supply to replenish, many scientists are certain it won’t be anytime soon.

“I wouldn’t be surprised if the stock didn’t come back for 20 years.” said Dr. Geoff Shester, California program director and senior scientist at Oceana, the world’s largest ocean conservation non-profit.

In 2012, scientists from the National Marine Fishery Service warned that another collapse was imminent — but this warning went largely unheeded. When this warning was issued, sardine biomass was still above the 150,000 ton threshold required for commercial fishing. The Pacific Fishery Management Council — whose members include fishermen, industry stakeholders, and federal and state officials from the National Marine Fisheries Service — said there wasn’t enough evidence of decline to justify a moratorium on commercial sardine fishing.

Sardine fishing continued until 2015, when the stock fell below the commercial cutoff and the directed fishery was closed. Shester believes the council’s failure to take precautionary measures made a bad situation worse.

“Because the population was already declining, and fishing made it worse, the stock is going to have a lot more trouble recovering than it would have had had we stopped fishing earlier,” said Shester.

Pacific sardines were on the rise during the early 2000s, but in 2006 the population took an unexpected downturn. Estimates suggest the Pacific sardine population decreased from 1.8 million tons to 86,000 tons between 2006 and 2017. The latest assessment puts the size of the Pacific sardine stock at a mere 52,065 tons, a fraction of the 150,000 ton threshold required for commercial fishing.

“Ultimately, a trade off was made to fish in the short term, and that’s now having this detrimental consequence that may last for decades,” said Shester.

Sardines are an important food source for several marine species including sea lions, salmon, brown pelicans, dolphins, and whales, and in California — whose coastal waters boast relatively large numbers of Pacific sardines — the fallout of their decline continues to be evident from shore.

Starving California sea lion pups have been washing up on beaches by the thousands since 2012, most suffering from malnutrition. According to a press release issued by the Marine Mammal Center in 2013, “The sardine and anchovy fish numbers were extremely low in 2012, and it appears this resulted in female adult sea lions having a difficult time providing enough nourishment to their pups.” Scientists estimate that 70 percent of California sea lion pups born between 2013 and 2014 died before weaning age due to a lack of nutrient rich food.

Even though the commercial sardine fishery is closed, you might still see sardines on the menu. The Pacific Fishery Management Council allows a few thousand tons to be harvested by fishermen who catch them incidentally or intend to sell them as live bait. In April, the council set an incidental catch limit of 7,000 tons for the 2018 fishing season.

Shester says this year’s incidental catch quota is “irresponsibly high” and considers the council’s decision to continue allowing a limited harvest a step in the wrong direction.

“There is no level of sustainable fishing on a stock that’s collapsing,” said Shester.

Fishermen rarely meet incidental catch quotas simply because it is very difficult to catch sardines by accident. In order to commercially land sardines caught incidentally, they have to make up less than 40 percent of your catch. Because sardines rarely form schools with other marketable species, achieving this ratio can be challenging.

If Pacific sardine biomass falls below 50,000 tons, fishery managers are required to close the live bait fishery and implement a moratorium on incidental harvest. In 2018, the estimated sardine stock was only 2,000 tons over this threshold. If current trends continue, it’s unlikely the stock will make this cutoff next year — but many fishermen have high hopes that it will.

In a press release issued earlier this month, Diane Pleschner-Steele, executive director of the California Wetfish Producers Association, said “fishermen are seeing more sardines, not less, especially in nearshore waters.”

Not only does Pleschner-Steele reject the notion that overfishing played a role in the decline of the sardine stock, she calls the stock’s collapse “fake news.”

“Oceana claims that overfishing is the cause of the sardine fishery decline, but the absolute opposite is true: fishing is a non-issue and more importantly, the sardine stock is not declining.”

Pleschner-Steele believes the way the National Marine Fishery Service conducts its sardine stock assessments is fundamentally flawed and urges members of her organization to disregard them.

“This [latest] stock assessment was an update that was not allowed to include any new methods and was based primarily on a single acoustic survey that reached only as far south as Morro Bay and totally missed the nearshore coastwide,” said Pleschner-Steele.

The National Marine Fishery Service has acknowledged its inability to survey nearshore areas, but the agency doesn’t believe the lack of this data has compromised the accuracy of its assessments.

“We’re likely missing some sardines but maybe not at a huge portion,” said Josh Lindsay, a fishery policy analyst from the National Marine Fisheries Service.

“There is a broad understanding from the agency that we are not sampling the entire population, and a lot of that uncertainty gets built into our stock assessment model,” said Lindsay

For the last several years, scientists from the National Marine Fishery Service have been developing new ways to improve the accuracy of the agency’s stock assessments. The agency recently announced plans to use solar powered autonomous drones, also known as saildrones, to survey waters that their ships can’t reach.

Pleschner-Steele hopes surveys of nearshore areas will prove her theory that the stock is increasing, but not all fishers share her optimism. Neil Guglielmo, a commercial fisherman and member of the California Wetfish Producers Association, fears the stock won’t bounce back in his lifetime. The commercial purse-seiner says he began to suspect the stock was crashing seven years ago, because sardines were becoming increasingly difficult to catch.

“When there’s a lot of fish around, they’re easy to catch,” said Guglielmo.

Guglielmo, who has been catching sardines, anchovies and squid off the California coast for more than 40 years, shares Pleschner-Steele’s view that the latest stock assessment underestimated the true size of the stock, but unlike Pleschner-Steele, Guglielmo doesn’t think the sardine population is bouncing back.

“I’m 76 years old. Unless something drastic happens, I don’t think I’ll ever fish sardines again,” said Guglielmo.

http://www.montereyherald.com/environment-and-nature/20180506/when-will-sardines-return-not-any-time-soon-say-scientists

Tell Congress: Protect Whales, Dolphins, Not Oil Interests

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act.oceana.org
Tell Congress: Protect Whales, Dolphins, Not Oil Interests
4-5 minutes

URGENT: Oil special interests in Congress are trying to gut the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA), an important ocean conservation law that seeks to restore and maintain healthy populations of all marine mammals in U.S. waters.

The changes proposed in a new bill could devastate populations of whales, dolphins, seals, manatees and other marine mammals, risk ocean health, and reverse years of ocean conservation. We must speak up for whales and other marine mammals now – this is a fight we must win.

Tell your member of Congress: Defend whales, dolphins and other marine mammals! Reject all proposed changes to the MMPA.

Dear Member of Congress,

I am writing to ask you to oppose any legislation that would weaken the Marine Mammal Protection Act, including H.R. 3133, the Streamlining Environmental Approvals Act.

The Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA) provides protections for all marine mammals in U.S. waters, including whales, dolphins, seals, sea otters, and manatees. It recognizes the importance of marine mammals to the oceans and seeks to restore or maintain populations of these animals at healthy and productive levels. The law protects marine mammals by prohibiting activities that harass, hunt, capture, or kill any marine mammal, or attempt to do so. There are already exemptions granted by the law that permit limited harm to marine mammals from human activities.

H.R. 3133 would gut core provisions of the law that require careful review before permits to harass marine mammals can be issued to industrial users of the ocean, such as oil and gas companies. Federal government scientists who are responsible for reviewing these permit requests and ensuring the protection of marine mammals would be sharply restricted in their ability to do so. For example, the bill would remove standards in the law to limit harm to “small numbers” of marine mammals. Furthermore, the bill would fast track approval of permits to harass marine mammals. Even worse, it would require automatic approval of permits to harm marine mammals if government scientists had not finished their reviews in short order.

Thanks to the Marine Mammal Protection Act, a number of marine mammal species that were suffering heavy losses or even facing extinction have grown to healthier population levels. Hundreds of thousands of dolphins have been saved from large commercial fishing nets in the Eastern Pacific Ocean, harbor porpoise deaths in the Gulf of Maine have declined, and Northern elephant and gray seal populations have rebounded. It is essential that the law remain highly protective, because it can take several decades, or even a century, for a species to recover from low population levels. This is particularly the case for longer-lived species such as whales, which may not start reproducing until they are 10-20 years old and can live to be over a hundred years old.

The MMPA provides vital protections that marine mammals cannot afford to lose. Human uses of the ocean can continue with these protections in place, just as they do now. Thanks to the MMPA, whales, dolphins, seals and other marine mammals have a fighting chance for survival.

Therefore, I urge you to maintain the Marine Mammal Protection Act in its current from by opposing H.R. 3133 and any other bills or amendments that aim to undermine or weaken this essential ocean conservation law.

https://act.oceana.org/page/13217/petition/1?ea.tracking.id=twitter&utm_campaign=Advo&utm_content=20180507HR3133Tweet&utm_source=Twitter&utm_medium=Social&utm_id=pWP8CmHDXUBxue