THE NEW YORKER: “Chick-fil-A’s Creepy Infiltration of New York City”

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Fixing Farming our climate challenge. #auspol #qldpol #StopAdani #ClimateChange

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https://jpratt27.wordpress.com/2018/04/15/fixing-farming-our-climate-challenge-auspol-qldpol-stopadani-climatechange/#like-12198

jpratt27.wordpress.com
Fixing Farming our climate challenge. #auspol #qldpol #StopAdani #ClimateChange
by John
9-11 minutes

Fixing farming our climate challenge

Rod Oram writes in this week’s column about farming’s massive climate change challenge and New Zealand’s special role in finding ways to reduce emissions.

“As a scientist I’ve never had so much reason to be nervous; and as a scientist I’ve never had so much reason to be hopeful.”

This was the essential message Johan Rockström, one of the world’s leading earth scientists, delivered this past week about climate change and our responses to it during his visit to New Zealand.

He entrusted a particular task to us: agriculture and food production globally present the greatest climate change challenge of all.

Their big adverse effects on the ecosystem are compounded by associated impacts through deforestation, agricultural monocultures, biodiversity loss and the declining health of soils and water.

It’s harder for farmers

All up agriculture broadly defined is the largest single source of greenhouse gases globally, says Rockström, who founded and leads the Stockholm Resilience Centre. But their technological and economic pathways to sustainability are far less clear than those for energy, transport and the built environment.

There are agricultural examples but we need much more innovation and ways to scale them up.

He believes New Zealand has a leading role to play globally in this agricultural transformation. On one hand, agriculture emissions are 49 percent of our total emissions, by far the highest proportion for a developed economy. On the other, our farmers and the scientists and businesses that support them, are among the most innovative in the world.

As an aside on that latter point, agricultural innovation is remarkably slow compared with all other industrial sectors. The average time from innovation to peak deployment of a new piece of agri-tech is 19.2 years here versus 52 years in the US. This insight was delivered recently to a symposium of Our Land and Water, one of our government’s 11 long-term National Science Challenges. Clearly, we have to innovate far faster.

Get moving now

But, Rockström stresses, the window of opportunity to address the totality of climate change is very small. Humankind is still generating a rising volume of emissions. If we are to stand any chance of keeping the rise in global temperatures to under 2 degrees C we have to start bending the curve down by 2020 then accelerate our emission reductions to a rate of about 6-7 percent a year.

While that might seem like a manageable rate, it will actually require transformational shifts in technology across all sectors of the economy. Pathways that are technologically practical and economically viable are increasingly clear in electricity and other sources of power, in transport and industrial processes.

For example, renewable electricity and other forms of energy, after growing by 5.5 per cent a year for the past 15 years, are starting to demonstrate exponential growth. A world free from fossil fuels is possible by 2045, Rockström says.

Earth scientist Johan Rockstrom from the Stockholm Resilience Centre.

The ‘Moore’s law’ of climate change

If, though, humankind can reduce its emissions by 6 to 7 per cent a year, we would halve emissions every decade and achieve near-zero emissions by 2050.

This is the Global Carbon Law Rockström and colleagues are proposing, equivalent to Moore’s Law in computing. It is the latest development of the work of the Stockholm Resilience Centre.

But maintaining that rate of reduction in carbon emissions over the next 30 years will take far more than just a complete switch to clean energy and sustainable agriculture.

We will also need to engineer carbon sinks, such as burning wood and other biofuels then capturing and storing the carbon emissions from them; and we will have to improve and monitor carefully the ecosystem health of land sinks such as forests and soil, and the ocean which currently absorbs a large proportion of the carbon emissions, and subsequent heat, generated by human activity.

If we do all that, “we have a 66 percent chance of staying under 2 degrees C,” Rockström says. But even that will cause ecosystem changes, moving us away from the Holocene, the geological epoch over the past 11,000 years which never saw temperature variations greater than plus or minus 1 degree C. This climate sweet spot was a “Garden of Eden”, Rockström says, in which humans have flourished.

Risks of feedback loops and tipping points

“We are already at 1.1 degree C. Even 1.5 degree C will be a challenge to adjust to.” Moreover, there are substantial risks that climate tipping points will trigger greater rises in temperature. Such feedback loops include forest dieback that would create savannahs that absorb far less carbon, and the loss of ice sheets, which not only raise sea levels but also reduce the white reflective surface of the planet, thereby increasing warming.

Responding to climate change will also take much more than science, technology change, targets and policies, he adds. All societies will need to progress a great deal so they have the capability to rise to the challenge of planetary stewardship.

For the first time we have a guide to that in the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals, which are applicable to all countries, developing and developed.

Usually, the 17 goals are presented in a matrix that doesn’t differentiate their priorities. Rockström’s Stockholm Resilience Centre, however, has arranged them with the four goals on the biosphere as the essential and critical base, with eight societal goals sitting above to help build healthy societies capable of rapid change, with four economic goals above, topped with the goal on partnerships for achieving the goals.

The Centre is renowned for its work identifying the nine biological-chemical-physical boundaries of the planet and measuring the extent human activity is overshooting them. So far, only climate change has a clearly defined target, which is based on zero carbon emissions by 2050 and a 1.5-2 degrees C temperature goal. That was extremely hard for scientists to establish and for the United Nations to get some commitments to steps towards it by nations in the Paris climate agreement of 2015.

The next big phase of the Centre’s research is to work with other scientists to devise numerical measures of a “safe place” for humankind within some of the other planetary boundaries. Like the crystal clear signals temperature sends on climate change, these will focus people, politicians, policy makers, and all other participants in society on the urgent need to bring human activity back within the boundaries.

The biodiversity challenge

Their top priority is biodiversity. Their extremely difficult scientific task is to develop a measure that not just expresses the rapid loss of species but also the impairment these losses have on ecosystem health and resilience, and thus the ability of those systems to provide for human needs. Some major multinationals, highly conscious of their impact on natural resources, are among the leaders of the push for a biodiversity measure, Rockström says.

While Rockström didn’t mention a particular role for New Zealand in that work, we have a lot to offer. Among developed countries, we are the most dependent on the natural environment for earning our living, most of our National Science Challenges are focused on ecosystems in whole or part and the relevant sciences are the ones we are best at commercialising.

Above all we are ambitious and innovative about ecosystems, witness our goal of being predator free by 2050 and the wave of science, research, development and creativity this is unleashing. The Cacophony Project is an impressive example but just one of a rapidly growing number.

Likewise, we have a burgeoning ecosystem of organisations in business and civil society focused on these enormous opportunities. Two examples are the Next Foundation (http://www.nextfoundation.org.nz/), which invests heavily in environmental programmes, and the Hillary Institute of International Leadership (http://www.hillaryinstitute.com/), based in Christchurch, which chooses each year a global leader in environmental issues.

Rockström is its 8th laureate and this award has brought him here to share his knowledge widely, including with the government, and to learn more about New Zealand. His biggest engagement was with the twice-a-year New Frontiers gathering of local and international experts on these intensely integrated issues of deep sustainability, which is run by the Edmund Hillary Fellowship.

“We are rolling in the right direction. We will decarbonise the world eventually – but are we moving fast enough?” He made it very clear to the New Frontiers audience that we are not.

But above all, he makes it abundantly clear that climate change is just one manifestation of humankind’s need for deep sustainability. We are the greatest driver of planetary change, greater than any natural force. Thus, this geological epoch is truly the Anthropocene.

Disclosure: I’m an Edmund Hillary Fellow, participated in New Frontiers, and was MC at the Our Land and Water symposium.

Press link for more: Newsroom.co.nz

 

(WEST YARMOUTH, Mass.) Latest: Yarmouth K-9 Officer Sean Gannon’s police dog, Nero, survived a surgery Friday for injuries he received in the Thursday shooting that killed Gannon, according to a Facebook post from the Yarmouth Police Department #AceNewsDesk reports

(BARNSTABLE, Mass.) JUST IN: A Yarmouth K-9 officer was shot and killed while executing a multi-agency search warrant Thursday afternoon: Multiple Massachusetts police departments expressed their condolences and extended their sympathies to the family of K-9 Officer Sean Gannon and the Yarmouth Police Department #AceNewsDesk reports

Stop Hunters From Slaughtering Wildlife With Assault Rifles

Hunters are slaughtering wolves near Denali National Park using assault rifles and other high powered weapons. Without intervention, these wolves will be driven to extinction. Sign this petition to demand stronger hunting restrictions.

Source: Stop Hunters From Slaughtering Wildlife With Assault Rifles

Save Endangered Green-Haired Turtle from Extinction

A rare turtle known for sporting green algae as ‘hair’ is one of the world’s most endangered reptiles. Sign the petition to demand protections to save this unique creature.

Source: Save Endangered Green-Haired Turtle from Extinction

Petition update · Adopted from Pets at Home to be fed to a snake! · Change.org

Apr 14, 2018 — This is Joey. Joey was about 3 months old when he was adopted from Pets at Home last summer. His new owner brought him home and put him in a hamster’s cage next to a vivarium containing a 6ft Burmese python. He had no hay, no water. He wasn’t given a name. He just sat there, waiting to be fed to the owner’s pet snake.

When the time came the owner lifted him out of the cage to put him in the vivarium but Joey bit him out of sheer terror. The owner also got bitten by the snake.

At that point, his girlfriend got cold feet and they decided they couldn’t do it.*

Luckily they contacted Baby Blue Bee Bunnies rescue centre who were able to take the poor terrified rabbit.

Joey was given a name and rehabilitation started. However, due to his traumatic experience, he was very aggressive and it took months to get him to finally relax. Joey was in good hands. The rescue centre gave him the time, the love, the care and the life that he truly deserved.

Joey was adopted and now lives happily with three other bunny friends.

Pets at home claim they have a ‘vigorous system for checking potential pet owners’. Once again they failed. Joey was purchased to become snake food.

Please share Joey’s story and urge Pets at Home STOP selling rabbits!

Rabbits should NOT be sold in pet shops! They should only be adopted from reputable rescue centres who carry out home checks and make sure they don’t end up in the wrong hands.

Rabbits need our help. Thank you for giving them a voice. Thank you for supporting this cause.

Isabelle Rineau for the BaBBA Campaign (Ban all Baby Bunny Ads)

https://www.facebook.com/groups/BABBACampaign

@BaBBACampaign

Video on YouTube:

*live feeding is illegal in the UK.

https://www.change.org/p/13094943/u/22634585?utm_medium=email&utm_source=petition_update&utm_campaign=304710&sfmc_tk=Y65ELrEVwnOSO7%2bDYTtOcSl7UwtBqQAaPN69K%2bfN2BQrIO1P2iajUKayyxkaVEmi&j=304710&sfmc_sub=61374949&l=32_HTML&u=54991369&mid=7259882&jb=1

Hear the Otherworldly Screams of Canada Lynx in Battle

Please do not listen with headphones on!!🙃  You’re welcome

Weird & WildVideo
Hear the Otherworldly Screams of Lynx in Battle
Male Canada lynx only have limited opportunity to mate with a female, making their rivalries especially intense.

Two Lynx Cats Scream at Each Other—Can You Stand It? WATCH: Lynx are largely solitary animals, but if two males do meet during mating season, a screaming match can result.
By Jason Bittel

PUBLISHED March 28, 2018

When it comes to courtship in the animal kingdom, frogs peep, crickets chirp, and cicadas click.

But nothing on Earth compares to the ruckus rendered by a male Canada lynx defending his mate.

Amos Wiebe, a photographer in Grande Prairie, Canada, personally experienced this otherworldly racket last week when he stumbled upon a trio of lynx while driving down a remote logging road. (Read about the lynx’s return to Canada.)

These Wild Cats Make the Weirdest Sound
Out of the Shadows, the Wildcats You’ve Never Seen
Which of These Animals is Tougher?

Wiebe was searching for northern pygmy owls to photograph when a flurry of movement caught his eye.

“All of a sudden, I saw a commotion,” he says. “These two lynx were just flying around up in the trees.”

Wiebe managed to park his truck and wade through deep snow to capture the wildcats’ effortless acrobatics on video.

“I’ve never seen a lynx do that. It’s like it was just suctioned to the tree,” says Wiebe. “They just climb up like it’s nothing.”
A Lynx Love Triangle

It may look like a fit of screaming cat chaos, but according to Shannon Crowley, a wildlife ecologist at the John Prince Research Forest in British Columbia, the scene provides a rare glimpse into the predators’ breeding behavior.

Based on the cats’ sizes and tufts of facial fur, called ruffs, Crowley says both lynx in the tree are likely males. And while he can’t be sure, the third lynx, which is not shown in the video, is likely female.

“To see that kind of aggression, there must be a female somewhere in the near vicinity,” says Crowley. (See photos of some of our favorite felines.)

New Video Reveals Lynx Mom and Kittens Frolicking in Snow Watch a lynx mother and her kittens scamper and play on a deck in Anchorage, Alaska.

Female lynx are thought to mate with just one male a year, says Crowley, so the bigger—and dominant—male had probably run the other cat up the tree to protect his breeding opportunity.

These battle cries are not the only spooky noises lynx make. During the breeding season, Crowley says he’s heard males following females through the trees while making a short, repetitive moan.
All Banshee, No Bite

Though they put on a fierce show, a fully grown, an adult male Canada lynx usually weighs no more than about 40 pounds, so it’s unlikely Wiebe was ever in any real danger, Crowley notes.

“Even when we would document litters at the den site, the female would generally run off,” he says. Though the little-seen cats are not dangerous to people, it’s important to give lynx—and any wildlife—a healthy distance. (Here are seven cats you never knew existed.)

Still, the photographer says he felt pretty vulnerable standing hip-deep in snow. At one point, Wiebe even pulled out a canister of bear spray, lest all that yowling were to attract a mountain lion.

And those unholy vocalizations didn’t help either.

“It certainly is an eerie sound to hear in the forest,” says Crowley.

https://news.nationalgeographic.com/2018/03/animals-lynx-mating-fighting-conflict/

Jason Bittel is a natural history writer and frequent contributor to National Geographic.
Follow Jason
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Copyright © 2015-2018 National Geographic Partners, LLC. All rights reserved

K9 Natural Dog Food Recall

dogfoodadvisor.com
K9 Natural Dog Food Recall
3-4 minutes

April 13, 2018 — K9 Natural Ltd is voluntarily recalling 4 batches of its K9 Natural Frozen Chicken Feast that were imported into the US in June 2017 because they have the potential to be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes.

 

About Listeria

Listeria monocytogenes is an organism that can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in humans and animals.

Symptoms of infection may include nausea, vomiting, aches, fever, and diarrhea, and may lead to most serious issues such as meningitis and abortion.

Healthy people and animals can be infected, and some are more susceptible, including young children, pregnant women, frail or elderly people or others with weakened immune symptoms.

Animals that become ill with Listeria monocytogenes could display symptoms similar to humans.

Listeria monocytogenes can affect animals eating the product.

There is risk to humans from handling the products, especially if they have not thoroughly washed their hands after having contact with the products or any surfaces exposed to the products.

No pet or human illnesses, injuries or complaints have been reported to date.

If you have any symptoms after handling the recalled product, please contact your healthcare provider.

If your pet has consumed the recalled product and has any symptoms, please contact your veterinarian.
What’s Recalled?

The recalled products include:

K9 Natural Frozen Chicken Feast
2.2 pound bags
Shipped to distributors in WA, CA, TX, CO
Distributed to pet specialty retail stores
Batch number: #170517 | Expiration date: 17NOV2018
K9 Natural Frozen Chicken Feast
11 pound bags
Shipped to distributors in WA, CA, TX, CO, PA
Distributed to pet specialty retail stores
Batch number: #150517 | Expiration date: 15NOV2018
Batch number: #160517 | Expiration date: 16NOV2018
Batch number: #170517 | Expiration date: 17NOV2018

Batch numbers and expiration dates are stamped in the bottom left on the back of the pack.
What to Do?

Purchasers are encouraged to check the batch code to see if their product was affected.

Pet owners who have product matching these batch codes should stop using the product and return the unused portion to the place of purchase for a full refund or replacement.

Consumers with questions may contact the company at 888-345-4680 Monday through Friday, 8 AM to 5 PM PT and ET, and Saturday through Sunday, April 14-15, 2018, 8 AM to 5 PM PT and ET.

Or by email: info@k9natural.com

U.S. citizens can report complaints about FDA-regulated pet food products by calling the consumer complaint coordinator in your area.

Or go to http://www.fda.gov/petfoodcomplaints.

Canadians can report any health or safety incidents related to the use of this product by filling out the Consumer Product Incident Report Form.
Get Dog Food Recall Alerts by Email

Get free dog food recall alerts sent to you by email. Subscribe to The Dog Food Advisor’s emergency recall notification system.

https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/dog-food-recall/k9-natural-dog-food-recall/