Boycott Super Bowl 51: Exec. Producer Promises Any Players Protesting Anthem ‘Will Be Shown Live’

Demorat Brooklyn assemblywoman indicted on fraud, witness-tampering charges

Punish Man Who Allegedly Starved and Neglected Two Dogs and a Cat

Two dogs and a cat were allegedly starved and neglected in a shocking case of animal cruelty. The dogs were reportedly severely emaciated, and the cat was locked in an enclosed room. Demand justice for these innocent animals.

Source: Punish Man Who Allegedly Starved and Neglected Two Dogs and a Cat

Dogs Violently Thrown Into Street Deserve Justice

Two dogs were swung around by their leashes and thrown into the street in a shocking case of animal cruelty. A gruesome video showed the dogs yelping as they hit the pavement. Demand justice for these poor dogs.

Source: Dogs Violently Thrown Into Street Deserve Justice

Stop Cutting Up and Serving Live Animals at Restaurants

Octopuss are being held down, cut up alive, and then served in sushi restaurants. Octopus can feel pain and are aware of each hack into their sensitive tentacles. Sign this petition to demand officials protect these animals and stop restaurants from preparing and serving live animals.

Source: Stop Cutting Up and Serving Live Animals at Restaurants

Boiling lobsters alive banned in Switzerland

Dear Kitty. Some blog

This video says about itself:

11 January 2018

The Guardian has reported that as of March 1 in Switzerland “the practice of plunging live lobsters into boiling water, which is common in restaurants, is no longer permitted.” The new ban is part of a wider overhaul of Swiss animal protection laws. As David Foster Wallace points out in “Consider the Lobster” when the animals are boiled alive they flail and cling to the pot trying to escape.

Will these new laws in Switzerland also ban eating cat and dogs, still legal now?

Translated from Dutch NOS TV today:

Switzerland forbids boiling lobsters alive, should we also do that?

From the aquarium into a pan of boiling water with claws handcuffed. It will no longer be possible in Switzerland in two months; then it will be illegal to boil lobsters alive. From now on, they must first be anesthetized…

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Serbia: Milica Is On The Streets. She Needs A Forever Home Or Sponsorship To Keep Her Safe From The Dogcatchers. Can You Help ? – See Facebook Link Below.

Serbian Animals Voice (SAV)

THIS BEAUTIFUL DOG IS MILICA.

She is living on the streets and has nothing and nobody.

One very kind rescuer, Andjelka Matijevic helps her by feeding her and she has had her spayed already to ensure she doesnt end up pregnant to some other street dog bringing more unwanted pups into the world.

But, this gentle quiet dog needs a home. She has no sponsors, nothing.

Maybe because she isnt aesthetically as beautiful as many other cute and fluffy dogs, but this is one very special diamond girl. She loves children, and plays beautifully with them. She adores other dogs, and has no issue at all with any other dog. We have no idea how she would react to cats, but bearing in mind she lives on the streets, Im sure she has learned to live alongside the many cats and other dogs on the streets whilst she seeks out…

View original post 212 more words

U.S. Wildlife Officials Propose Endangered Status For Florida Crayfish | WGCU News

 

unnamed.jpghttp://news.wgcu.org/post/us-wildlife-officials-propose-endangered-status-florida-crayfish

By Jessica Meszaros • Jan 3, 2018

The Panama City crayfish is listed on the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission website as a “Species of Special Concern.” Now the U.S Fish and Wildlife Service proposes it be a federally protected species.

Federal wildlife officials proposed Tuesday to protect a crayfish only found in Bay County under the Endangered Species Act.

panamacitycrayfish__1_.jpg

The Panama City crayfish is only about 2 inches long, it’s tan-colored and has red dots on its head. There are only 13 populations found in Bay County with less than 100 crustaceans in each habitat.

Tierra Curry, senior scientist with the Center for Biological Diversity, says all the Panama City crayfish historically lived together in wetlands of the Pine Flatwood Forest, but then they were separated as the land was developed.

“The crayfish have been pushed into these little habitats like ditches and swells,” she says.

Curry says these crustaceans are important for multiple reasons. They create burrows that other species use, like insects and frogs. The crustaceans are also part of the food web— fish, birds and mammals eat them. And they’re herbivores that eat decaying vegetation in the water, essentially cleaning it.

“So protecting crayfish ultimately protects clean water for people,” says Curry.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service recently proposed classifying the crayfish as a protected endangered species. Curry says there will now be a public comment period, then scientists will weigh-in, and then she expects the Panama City crayfish to be federally protected in about a year.

UPDATE: The source for this story referred the the Panama City crayfish as a “fish,” but it’s actually a “crustacean.”

 

 

California Puts Freeze on New Uses of Bee-killing Pesticides

Center for Biological Diversity

For Immediate Release, January 4, 2018

Contact: Lori Ann Burd, (971) 717-6405, laburd@biologicaldiversity.org

California Puts Freeze on New Uses of Bee-killing Pesticides

SACRAMENTO, Calif.— California’s Department of Pesticide Regulation has announced it will no longer consider any applications by pesticide companies that would expand use of bee-killing neonicotinoid pesticides in the state.

The announcement comes just two weeks after the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency began considering dramatically expanding use of the highly toxic neonicotinoid thiamethoxam on more than 165 million acres of farmland in the United States.

“California’s decision to halt further increases in harmful neonicotinoid pesticides is an important step toward reversing dangerous bee declines,” said Lori Ann Burd, director of the Center for Biological Diversity’s environmental health program. “As the Trump EPA works to weaken protections for pollinators, it’s reassuring that California continues to follow a course of reason and science.”

California’s freeze on new neonicotinoid uses and products covers all new and pending applications and will be lifted once the agency finishes an ongoing evaluation of the pesticides. California’s evaluation, which is being done in conjunction with the U.S. EPA, has identified harms to pollinators, aquatic insects and birds from the use of neonicotinoids.

The state’s efforts to prevent expansion of harmful neonicotinoid pesticides stands in sharp contrast to the EPA’s decision last month to consider allowing the spraying of the highly toxic pesticide thiamethoxam on tens of millions of acres of wheat, barley, corn, sorghum, alfalfa, rice and potatoes.

On the same day it began considering approving broader use of thiamethoxam, the EPA released multiple scientific assessments that found commonly used neonicotinoid pesticides can kill and harm birds of all sizes.

The EPA analysis found that if neonic-treated seeds make up just 1 percent to 6 percent of a bird’s diet, serious harms could result.

Early last year the EPA changed from mandatory to voluntary a common-sense rule that would have placed limited restrictions on neonics when commercial honeybees were present in fields.

Neonicotinoids are a class of pesticides known to have both acute and chronic effects on honeybees, birds, butterflies and other pollinator species, and they are a major factor in overall pollinator declines. These systemic insecticides cause entire plants, including pollen and fruit, to become toxic to pollinators; they are also slow to break down and therefore build up in the environment.

A large and growing body of independent science links neonicotinoids to catastrophic bee declines. Twenty-nine independent scientists who conducted a global review of more than 1,000 independent studies on neonicotinoids found overwhelming evidence linking the pesticides to declines in populations of bees, birds, earthworms, butterflies and other wildlife.

The Center for Biological Diversity is a national, nonprofit conservation organization with more than 1.6 million members and online activists dedicated to the protection of endangered species and wild places.

http://www.biologicaldiversity.org

http://www.biologicaldiversity.org/news/press_releases/2018/pesticides-01-04-2018.php/?utm_source=eeo&utm_medium=email

SEAL SLAMS OPRAH: ‘YOU’VE BEEN PART OF THE PROBLEM FOR DECADES FOR IGNORING WEINSTEIN RUMORS…NOW YOU THINK YOU’RE THE SOLUTION’