Hilarious pictures prove why pooches are a man’s best friend

boldcorsicanflame's Blog

This dog owner snapped a picture of his pet half-standing in a shallow pool giving the appearance of oversized hind legs. He labelled it 'doggosauraus rex' on social media

This dog owner snapped a picture of his pet half-standing in a shallow pool giving the appearance of oversized hind legs. He labelled it ‘doggosauraus rex’ on social media

Reddit user soundersfan17 joked that he had captured his hound's perfect Tinder profile picture after taking a snap of the Italian greyhound posing suggestively in front of a fire

Some dogs like to protect their owners - but not this husky, whose fear of vacuum cleaners forces her into her master's arms

They really are a man's best friend! One adorable pooch demonstrates the close bond he share with his owner as the pair are pictured enjoying a chinwag

One Imgur user with the username ihopethiscomesoffwitty walked in to find his pet stuck inside what looks like a grey pair of tracksuit bottoms - likening it to a 'loose seal' 

This poor pooch looks less than impressed as she weans her litter of adorable puppies

One owner's Snapchat proved quite the optical illusion as her pair of adorable golden retrievers appeared to have 'merged'

  •  Hilarious collection shows off pet owners’ and animal lovers’ funniest Snapchats
  • One cat likes to pose upright in the shower like a shampoo bottle 
  • Three-day-old chicks seen cleverly huddling around a coffee mug for warmth 
  • One bird enthusiast spent 18 months training one to wear a hat for a photo

Read more and see More Photos on : http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-4829382/Are-best-dog-Snapchats-EVER.html#ixzz4r4S1jqQ4

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SJWs want veterans ‘banned’ from four-year colleges — and veteran responds forcefully

Nwo Report

The University of Colorado-Colorado Springs approved of someone posting a flyer on the school’s campus that says veterans should be “banned” from four-year colleges and universities.

The flyer is the first issue in a newsletter series that is titled “Social Justice Collective Weekly.” A spokesman for UCCS said the newsletter is not affiliated with the university and that any student can post flyers on bulletin boards around campus. But, as KKTV-TV noted, the school does have to approve any flyers that are posted around the campus. Now, in light of the fact that campus officials approved the flyer, the school is trying to distance itself from the message in the flyers.

According to KKTV, the flyers make extremely broad generalizations about those who fought to protect the freedoms of millions of Americans. The pamphlets claim that “many veterans openly mock the ideas of diversity and safe spaces for vulnerable…

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Speak Up Now for Wild Horses under Threat from Ag/Cattle Industry!

JaneUnChained.com

Horse advocates with the American Wild Horse Campaign are urging animal lovers to call their 2 US Senators & their members of Congress NOW to say:NO on the Chris Stewart Amendment to the 2018 appropriations bill! This would be a disaster for America’s wild horses! Call 202 224-3121 NOW! We need to protect wild horses on the range, not round them up or kill them. Critics denounce what they describe as a “secret summit” on the wild horse issue that excluded wild horse advocates while government officials talked in what critics called an anti-horse echo chamber. Call NOW! Fr more: https://americanwildhorsecampaign.org

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YouTube targets multiple pro-Trump musical artists

Nwo Report

Singer Joy Villa took to Twitter on Saturday to let her fans and fellow conservatives know that YouTube threatened to remove her song “Make America Great Again” for privacy violations. She also said YouTube removed views from fellow Donald Trump supporter Kaya Jones’ song “What the Heart Don’t Know.”

Villa tweeted a copy of the email she received from YouTube, which told her she had 48 hours to edit the violated content in her video. If she failed to comply, the YouTube team would review the complaint and may remove the video.

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Petition: Support the Pet and Women’s Safety Act


http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/178/624/419/

Petition: Cop Shoots Family Dog In The Head


http://www.thepetitionsite.com/265/775/061/cop-shoots-family-dog-with-no-consequences/?TAP=1732

Monkey Denied Water for 72 Hours in Brown University Laboratory | Save Animals | peta2

Please Sign Petition…

https://action.peta2.com/page/2515/action/1?utm_source=peta2::E-Mail&utm_medium=E-News&utm_campaign=0817::gen::peta2::E-Mail::P2%20Bi%20Weekly%20Recap%20August%20Twenty%20Seven%20EA::::p2%20e-news

Shelters See Influx of Huskies Due to Game of Thrones Popularity | peta2

GoT Star Urges Fans Who Love Direwolves to Stop Buying Huskies
Posted by Uzo on August 15, 2017
Game of Thrones has gained a huge following since it first hit the screen, and fans can’t get enough. But the show’s extremely popular direwolves have sparked an alarming trend: There’s an increased demand for Siberian huskies (who look similar to the mystical wolves), and their owners are surrendering them to already overcrowded shelters after realizing how much work and commitment it takes to care for them. GoT star and longtime vegetarian Peter Dinklage teamed up with PETA to share an important message with fans:

“Please, to all of Game of Thrones‘ many wonderful fans, we understand that due to the direwolves’ huge popularity, many folks are going out and buying huskies,” Dinklage says. “Please, please, if you’re going to bring a dog into your family, make sure that you’re prepared for such a tremendous responsibility and remember to always, ALWAYS, adopt from a shelter.”

Ritmó

Here’s the deal: Thronies are naming these huskies, who they bought at pet stores or from breeders, after their fave GoT characters and later taking them to animal shelters when they get tired of caring for them. <!–3 Two breed-specific rescue groups in Northern California have taken in twice as many huskies as usual in the last two years, and the U.K. has also seen similar statistics since the show first aired in 2011.As Dinklage explains, “Not only does this hurt all the deserving homeless dogs waiting for a chance at a good home in shelters, but shelters are also reporting that many of these huskies are being abandoned—as often happens when dogs are bought on impulse, without understanding their needs.”

GoT’s direwolves are awesome animals: They are super-loyal, can read the mind of their human companion, and fiercely protect those they love. So, we get how welcoming an animal who resembles them into your home has HUGE appeal. However, huskies require lots of love and attention, and taking care of an animal companion is a huge responsibility. Simply put, this isn’t a casual puppy love situation.

There’s a homeless-animal overpopulation crisis in the U.S. Each year, more than 6 million dogs and cats enter shelters, and half of them are euthanized because there aren’t enough homes for them. And buying a husky from a breeder or a pet store prevents many dogs in shelters from finding a loving home.

Dinklage, who previously teamed up with peta2 for a video about the meat industry, is part of a long list of celebrities—including his GoT co-star Lena Headey—who have worked with us to promote kindness to animals. He wants people looking to welcome a pup into their homes to remember that having a dog is a lifetime gig, and he’s urging others to adopt, never buy.
What You Can Do

If your family has the time, space, and financial means to care for a dog, adopt one from an open-admission animal shelter. (Check Petfinder to find shelters in your area.)
Never buy animals from a pet store or breeder. Every dollar spent purchasing an animal from a pet store encourages the store to continue buying animals from cruel breeding mills.
Spread the word on Facebook and Twitter.

Pledge to End Animal Homelessness

https://www.peta2.com/news/game-of-thrones-huskies/

Accessibility Disclaimer Privacy Policy Site Terms of Use Texting Terms Contest Terms Report Website Error Help Hotlines © 2017 PETA. Read our full policy PETA is a nonprofit, tax-exempt 501(c)(3) corporation

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Tell Hampton Creek and Impossible Foods to STOP Testing on Animals! | Save Animals | peta2

There is nothing veganfriendly about exploiting animals in product testing!

 https://action.peta2.com/page/2552/action/1?utm_source=peta2::E-Mail&utm_medium=E-News&utm_campaign=0817::gen::peta2::E-Mail::P2%20Bi%20Weekly%20Recap%20August%20Twenty%20Seven%20EA::::p2%20e-news

New ISIS Video Shows 10 Yr Old American With Rifle Vowing To ‘Defeat’ Trump

Nwo Report

ISIS released a video on Wednesday featuring a 10-year-old American boy named Yusef who vows on camera to “defeat” President Donald Trump. 

The boy, who claims to be the son of a U.S. soldier, warns that savage ISIS militants are on the brink of invading America, and will “defeat” Trump, who he calls the “puppet of the jews.”

“My message to Trump, the puppet of the Jews, Allah has promised us victory and promised you defeat. This battle is not going to end in Raqqa or Mosul, it’s going to end in your lands. By the will of Allah, we will have victory so get ready for the fighting has just begun,” the boy says.

Fox News reports: The video, which was released Wednesday, shows Yusuf and his purported 7-year-old friend Abdallah at locations throughout the ISIS stronghold of Raqqa, Syria. Yusuf says he “didn’t know much about Islam except…

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A Rare Entity In Turkmenistan: Private Shelter Saves Stray Dogs

https://www.rferl.org/a/qishloq-ovozi-turkmenistan-animal-shelter/28698278.html
A Rare Entity In Turkmenistan: Private Shelter Saves Stray Dogs
August 26, 2017 12:12 GMT

Bruce Pannier

  1. Island of Hope has saved many animals from being poisoned or clubbed to death by roving municipal animal-extermination squads.

Turkmenistan has just officially registered its first animal shelter, which is in itself welcome news, but there is something else unique about it.

The Island of Hope shelter has been operating informally for several years as the result of private initiative.

In a country where the government controls so much of society and where the government seems to be the originator of every organization or so-called grassroots movement, it is interesting to see such personal initiative.

Suspect, however, is the timing of the announcement that officially registered the shelter.

Turkmenistan is hosting the Asian Indoor and Martial Arts Games from September 17-27 and the country can certainly use all the positive press it can get.

Turkmenistan is best known as an isolated country where the government is a rights abuser, an enemy of the press, and, according to some reports in the run-up to the Asian Games, also a butcher of stray animals in the capital.

EurasiaNet did a great job of explaining the situation regarding animal rights, or lack thereof, in the Turkmen capital, Ashgabat.

The quandary at the Qishloq is how has Tatyana Galberg, her husband Nikolai, and daughters Irina and Katya been able to operate an unofficial shelter that cares for more than 100 dogs and some 50 cats found on the streets, without any seeming interference from officials.

OK — it’s an animal shelter and presumably a nonprofit venture, a charity really, so there’s nothing that would directly interest anyone in the Turkmen government.

But people in Turkmenistan are not encouraged to come up with plans or projects, no matter how well-intentioned, and enact them without any involvement of the authorities.

Now that the government has announced the registration of Island of Hope, Turkmen officials are also promising the shelter — located some 30 kilometers outside Ashgabat — will get a plot of land, a free supply of medicine, food, and materials needed to house animals.

The shelter could use the help, as currently the main source of food for the animals is macaroni. But help is likely not coming from the government anytime soon.

Turkmenistan is facing tough economic times, with some state employees not being paid on time.

At the Qishloq we are rooting for the Galberg family and their kindhearted project and we wish she could have spoken with us more than just to simply say she had been advised (she did not say by whom) not to speak with the press about the shelter.

Island of Hope has saved many animals from being poisoned or clubbed to death by roving municipal animal-extermination squads, as detailed in the EurasiaNet article.

And if the Galbergs can continue to care for animals at the shelter, as they have for several years, maybe the Turkmen government will promote the idea of local or personal initiatives aimed at improving the country and its society, especially if they pose no threat whatsoever to the regime.
RFE/RL’s Turkmen Service contributed to this report. The views expressed in this blog post do not necessarily reflect those of RFE/RL

Caturday funnies

Big Brother Spy Culture: How your AccuWeather app is spying on you

TheBreakAway

Source: RT
August 23, 2017

A popular weather app known for precise forecasts and storm warnings has been caught tracking users and sharing the location data with a third-party monetizing firm. RT America’s Marina Portnaya brings us the details.

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Tinder urges singletons to stop posting selfies with ‘drugged up’ tigers after pressure from animal activists

Exposing the Big Game

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4757948/Tinder-urges-users-stop-posting-selfies-tigers.html

  • The company has pledged to donate $10,000 if people stop posting the pictures
  • It has said the pictures ‘take advantage of beautiful creatures’ torn from their natural environment
  • The move follows pressure from animal rights group PETA, which wrote to co-founder Sean Rad
  • Selfies with tigers are so popular on the site that a number of Instagram accounts have been set up to share them 

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4757948/Tinder-urges-users-stop-posting-selfies-tigers.html#ixzz4qQC3RGfv
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

Dating app Tinder has called on its users to stop posting pictures of themselves alongside heavily-drugged tigers.

The company has said it is time for the selfies to go, claiming they take advantage of ‘beautiful creatures that have been torn from their natural environment’.

It follows calls from animal rights activists to act on the images, which they say appear frequently…

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Dog Days …..

HOW GOOGLE IS SECRETLY RECORDING YOU

WebInvestigator.KK.org - by F. Kaskais

DID you know that Google has been recording you without your knowledge?

The technology giant has effectively turned millions of its users’ smartphones into listening devices that can capture intimate conversations — even when they aren’t in the room.

If you own an Android phone, it’s likely that you’ve used Google’s Assistant, which is similar to Apple’s Siri.

Google says it only turns on and begins recording when you utter the words “OK Google”.

But a Sun investigation has found that the virtual assistant is a little hard of hearing, reports The Sun.

In some cases, just saying “OK” in conversation prompted it to switch on your phone and record around 20 seconds of audio.

It regularly switches on the microphone as you go about your day-to-day activities, none the wiser.

Once Google is done recording, it uploads the audio files to its computer servers…

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Fat polar bears [and lots of them] drive public confidence in future of the species

!Wildlife

polarbearscience

What is causing the death of the polar bear as a climate change icon? Fat bears are part of it, but mostly it’s the fact that polar bear numbers haven’t declined as predicted.

Western Hudson Bay polar bears around Churchill, Manitoba appear mostly in good shape this summer despite thevery late freeze-up last fall, including the very fat bear caught on camera below (see more great pictures here):

Churchill_PolarBears_FAT bear post_21 Aug 2017

Not only have we been seeing pictures of fat bears rather than starving bears in recent years butthere are lots of them, in Western Hudson Bay and other seasonal sea ice regions where there should be none (if the models had been correct). No wonder polar bears arefalling out of favour as an icon for catastrophic human-caused global warming.

[Here’s another picture of a fat bear, this one from Svalbard]

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The Great American Eclipse

Soulja Girl

I wanted to share this picture with y’all of the eclipse the other day it’s beautiful ❤

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San Onofre Safety | Nuclear Safety and Cost

Please take action and sign the petition… 

https://sanonofresafety.org/

How an Engineer Took on the Mystery of the Hunley | Science | Smithsonian

One Scientist May Have Finally Figured Out the Mystery of Why a Civil War Submarine Sank
A Navy engineer used creative modeling and her knowledge of underwater explosions to tackle the century-old Hunley conundrum

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The H.L. Hunley, a confederate Civil War era submarine, sits in its water tank at the Hunley Lab in North Charleston, SC. (Mic Smith Photography LLC / Alamy)
By Evan Lubofsky, Hakai Magazine
smithsonian.com
August 23, 2017

This article is from Hakai Magazine, an online publication about science and society in coastal ecosystems. Read more stories like this at hakaimagazine.com.

Around 6:30 p.m. on February 17, 1864, eight men crammed into the Confederate submarine H. L. Hunley, a self-propelled metal tube attached to a bomb, and slipped quietly into the freezing black water off the coast of Charleston, South Carolina. The crew hand-cranked the sub more than six kilometers toward its target—the Union blockader USS Housatonic—and surfaced like a leviathan for the charge. By 9:00 p.m., it was over: The Hunley had thrust its spar-mounted torpedo into the Housatonic’s hull and within seconds, 60 kilograms of black powder had caved in the ship.

Just after the brief moment of glory, the Hunley, which had just become the world’s first successful combat submarine, mysteriously sank.

Its demise has baffled scores of researchers and Civil War buffs for more than a century. Now, one maverick scientist is making the bold claim that she has cracked the case. After three years of sleuthing, Rachel Lance, a U.S. Navy biomedical engineer who holds a PhD from Duke University’s Pratt School of Engineering in North Carolina, concludes that the blast from the sub’s own torpedo sent blast waves through its iron hull and caused instant death for the eight men inside.

If she’s right, the mystery of the Hunley may finally be put to rest. But how she made the discovery is almost as surprising as the discovery itself: She did it without access to the physical sub, which was excavated in 2000; without prior experience in archaeology or forensics; and without help from the Hunley Project, a team of researchers and scientists at Clemson University in South Carolina that has been on the case full time for the past 17 years.

Without collaboration or key pieces of data, could Lance’s account of the final moments of the Hunley and its crew be right?


On a warm September Saturday, I’m standing outside the student center at Duke, a low-rise contemporary building accented with the university’s signature neo-Gothic stone, when Lance swings around the bend in a blue Pontiac Grand Prix straight out of Motor City where she grew up. As I open the passenger door to introduce myself, I’m hit by a wall of thumping workout music. Lance just came from the gym, and her brown, shoulder-length hair is thrown up in an elastic. A blue, stonewashed T-shirt that reads Detroit rides up her pale, lanky arms.

As we make our way off campus, the music keeps pumping.

“Where are we headed?” I yell.

“I’m taking you to the campus pond to see where we ran some of our experiments,” she thunders back. “It’s quiet there so we can talk.”.

conrad_wise_chapman_-_submarine_torpedo_boat_hl_hunley_dec_6_1863

An oil painting by Conrad Wise Chapman, circa 1898, depicts the inventor of the ill-fated H. L. Hunley, along with a sentinel.
An oil painting by Conrad Wise Chapman, circa 1898, depicts the inventor of the ill-fated H. L. Hunley, along with a sentinel. (Wikimedia Commons)

Lance was modeling an underwater explosion at a computer in Duke’s Injury Biomechanics Lab, where she studied blast injuries, when her adviser had the epiphany that set her Hunley obsession in motion. What if, biomechanical engineer Dale Bass suggested, the modeling software could virtually reconstruct the attack on the Housatonic and reveal insights into the fate of the Hunley? Lance, a history buff, was hooked: a historical mystery with a tantalizing lead to follow. Eventually she’d abandon the software for a more hands-on experimental approach, but lass’s idea was the catalyst she needed.

She began reading theories about why the Hunley went down. One prevailing idea was that the crew ran out of oxygen and suffocated. It was exactly the type of theory she was poised to tackle: she’s been a civil service engineer with the U.S. Navy since 2009 and has expertise in breathing system dynamics and, more specifically, rebreathers—the closed-circuit breathing systems divers use to recycle breathing gas underwater.

As her investigation got underway, Lance noticed there was very little, if any, published research on the crew’s oxygen consumption during the mission. With the navy, she had researched the phenomenon of how much oxygen people used while operating hand-pedal ergometers requiring the same type of motion as the Hunley’s hand-cranked propulsion system. So, she dug up the data and used it to calculate how much oxygen the crew would have used while cranking their way toward the Housatonic.

It wasn’t clear how much oxygen there was to begin with, though. After hauling up the sub, the Hunley Project conservators calculated how much air was likely available. Their data suggests the crew had enough air for little more than two hours. Lance, however, didn’t have access to the actual data. She had met with project members to discuss collaboration, but they wouldn’t share their calculations with her (and, later on, would ask Lance to sign a non-disclosure agreement, which she’d decline). She’d have to go her own way.


She mulled over the problem for days. Then, she remembered thumbing through a newsletter published by Friends of the Hunley, a nonprofit in Charleston that handles outreach, fundraising, and development for the Hunley Project and runs tours at Clemson’s Warren Lasch Conservation Center where the Hunley is being restored. It was filled with interior and exterior photos of the sub, most of which had measurement notations below them. That gave her an idea.

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Rachel Lance and her assistants
Rachel Lance and her assistants test the CSS Tiny’s gauges with shock tubes at the Duke University reclamation pond in North Carolina. (Courtesy of Rachel Lance/Duke University)

For the next month, Lance sat hunched over her desk printing out photos of the sub, measuring each demarcated point with a ruler. After weeks of painstaking work, she finally had all the measurements necessary to calculate oxygen consumption versus supply. The results leapt off the page. Suffocation was not a plausible explanation for why the Hunley sank.

“Even with conservative calculations, the crew would have been experiencing noticeable hyperventilation, gasping for breath, choking, symptoms of panic, and likely physical pain from high levels of CO2 in the blood,” she says. “But we also know from records that they were seated peacefully at their stations without any signs of struggle. So, from my perspective, this tossed the suffocation theory out the window.” The findings were published in the March 2016 issue of the journal Forensic Science International.

Richard Moon, the medical director of the Duke Center for Hyperbaric Medicine and Environmental Physiology, agrees. He helped Lance run the calculations and says, “You have a bunch of submariners who were working moderately hard in an enclosed space. There’s no way they would be working away at the crank in a 10 percent oxygen environment with high levels of CO2 and say, ‘Oh well, things are fine; we’ll just keep on going.’”

The folks at Clemson weren’t convinced. Kellen Correia, president and executive director of the Friends of the Hunley, stated in an email that, “It’s premature to draw any final conclusions about the causes of the loss of the submarine or death of the crew, especially when looking at only one aspect of the situation.” She didn’t, however, reference any specific issues with Lance’s findings.


Debunking the suffocation theory offered Lance some short-term satisfaction, but by this point, she was in deep. She began thinking about the Hunley around the clock, obsessing over it to the point where she’d zone out and stare into her plate of food during dinner with her fiancé. “There was something viscerally terrifying about the fact that eight people died that night, and we had no idea how or why,” she says.

In the meantime, Hunley Project conservators at the Warren Lasch Conservation Center were chiseling—and continue to chisel—their way through the stubborn, concrete-like layer of sand and silt that formed around the Hunley as it sat on the seafloor for more than 100 years.

“The de-concretion has the opportunity to give us more information,” says Clemson archeologist Michael Scafuri, “but we haven’t uncovered any definitive evidence to completely explain the loss of the Hunley. Nothing in and of itself explains what happened.”

There hasn’t been any case-cracking evidence on the human remains side, either. Linda Abrams, a forensic genealogist who has been working on and off with the Hunley Project since 2006, says all of the crew member skeletons were in good shape when they were excavated from the Hunley’s interior. The sub was completely filled with sediment when it was salvaged, so layer upon layer of muck had to be carefully removed before the bones were exposed. “There were no bullet wounds in any of these guys,” she says. And no signs of desperation.

While the scientists haven’t come up with a smoking gun, there is a small area of damage to the sub’s exterior that has stumped them. The forward conning tower has a softball-sized chunk of iron missing where a viewport had been.

animation-hunley.gif
Popular Science Monthly
A 1900 edition of Popular Science Monthly included this depiction of the cramped quarters within the H. L. Hunley, which we have animated. While nine men are shown here, the Hunley is believed to have had an eight-man crew the night it sank in 1864. (Popular Science Monthly)

Through her research, Lance learned of the damage to the conning tower and the so-called lucky shot theory: a stray bullet fired by Housatonic sailors during the attack punctured the tower, causing the sub to fill with water and sink.

From Scafuri’s perspective, it is a possibility. “The gunfire from the Housatonic may have played a role in this,” he says, “but we cannot confirm that at this point.”

Lance tested the theory by shooting Civil War-era firearms at cast iron samples—the damage to the sub was inconsistent with damage from her rifle fire. Plus, she says, a bullet hole would have allowed water to rush into the sub quickly and caused it to sink much closer to the attack site than where it was found.

Based on her results, Lance crossed the lucky shot theory off her list and documented the findings in a second paper in Forensic Science International.

The Friends of the Hunley declined to comment on the specific findings, but Correia wrote, “Again, Ms. Lance doesn’t have any primary knowledge or data of the Hunley Project.”

Lance pressed on. If the crew hadn’t suffocated, and a bullet hole didn’t sink the sub, what did happen?


When the Hunley took down the towering Housatonic, it was less than five meters away from the blast. And, it was still attached to the torpedo; inspired by Confederate steam-powered torpedo boats known as Davids during the Civil War, the Hunley’s crew had bolted the sub’s torpedo onto the end of its spar. This meant the same explosion that rocked the Housatonic could just as well have meant lights out for the Hunley crew.

Lance had spent the better part of two years investigating the suffocation and lucky shot theories, published twice, and still hadn’t solved the mystery. For her, this explosion theory was the next obvious avenue to explore, and one that meshed well with her injury biomechanics focus at Duke. If a blast wave from the explosion propagated into the interior of the sub, she reasoned, it could have immediately killed the crew or at least injured them sufficiently that they would have been unable to pilot the boat to safety. “When blast waves hit an air space, they slow down like a car hitting a wall,” she explains. “Except in this case, the wall is the surface of the lungs.” The sailors’ lungs could have ruptured and filled with blood.

To test the theory, Lance needed a physical model of the sub. Enter the CSS Tiny, a scale model a sixth the size of the tour bus-length Hunley. Made out of sheet metal, it was a Hunley mini-me right down to ballast tanks filled with water and a steel spar mounted to the bow.

Engineering a miniature submarine wasn’t a stretch for Lance, who grew up working on old cars with her father, a now-retired GM autoworker. As a kid, she was small enough to slide under their 1966 Mustang to change the oil without jacking up the car. “Growing up around car culture makes it easy to fall in love with machinery and engineering,” she says.

rachel-tiny-hunley
North Carolina
At a farm in rural North Carolina, Rachel Lance and one of her assistants, Luke Stalcup, prepare the CSS Tiny to receive explosions to test her blast wave theory. (Photo by Denise Lance)

A few minutes after peeling away from campus in Lance’s Pontiac, we pull into a dusty lot at the Duke University reclamation pond. The thumping bass line cuts out abruptly and the soundtrack is replaced with the ratchet-like chorus of crickets. At the pond’s edge, she gestures to the water, thick with algae: this is where the Tiny took a test run. Lance and a few members from her lab used blast simulation devices known as shock tubes to test the Tiny’s pressure gauges and other equipment in advance of the live explosives phase of the experiment. As she stood in the water, raising and lowering the shock tubes, fish chomped at her legs. It was as if she was being repeatedly stabbed with tiny knives—but by the end of it, Lance and the Tiny were ready for the big event.


The campus pond was off limits to real explosives, so, two weeks later, Lance and her research team trekked out to a three-hectare pond on a rural North Carolina farm for the live ammo tests. They parked the Tiny in the middle of the pond, and with an explosives agent standing guard, the stage was set. Lance began the countdown: “Five! Four! Three! …” The culmination of months of hard work all came down to the next few seconds, and her nerves were frayed as she frantically clicked between sensor readout screens on her laptop.

From a safe distance, farmer Bert Pitt and his grandchildren were ready for the show. Lance had sweet-talked him into volunteering his pond for the project. “When Rachel came out to the farm,” says Pitt in a thick southern drawl, “she tried to butter me up with red velvet cake and explained that it would only be a one-sixth-scale explosion.”

“Two! One!” Pfffsssssttt! The black powder charge exploded on the Tiny’s spar, and a small geyser of pond water erupted. Pressure gauges hung inside and outside the vessel to measure the underwater blast waves. Below the surface, the explosion jetted a blast wave into the Tiny’s hull with so much force that it caused the metal to flex. That motion, in turn, generated a second blast wave that transmitted straight through the hull into the cabin.

“The secondary blast wave from this would have easily caused pulmonary blast trauma that killed the whole crew instantly,” Lance says. “This is what sank the Hunley.”

Moon supports the conclusion. He says most people would assume that the cabin walls would have protected the crew from the blast waves—but few people know much about underwater explosions. “Speculation up to this point has been fine,” he says, “but when you hold it up to hard science, I think the blast wave theory is the most plausible explanation.”

testing-hunley
Rachel Lance
Rachel Lance stands with her model of the H. L. Hunley—the CSS Tiny—at the Duke University reclamation pond. (Photo by Eric Wei)

While Lance believes the mystery of the Hunley can finally be put to rest, the Hunley Project scientists aren’t ready to jump to conclusions. They’ve acknowledged the explosion theory as a possibility in the past, but began to doubt it prior to Lance’s experiment based on results from a computer modeling study conducted by the US Navy in 2013. The study suggests the blast wave would not have harmed the crew, yet further studies continue to second-guess any previous study conclusions.

“The problem is, it’s a complicated scenario,” says Scafuri. “It’s sort of like trying to reconstruct the causes of a car accident with limited information. Would you be able to find evidence of an accident that happened because a bee flew in through the window and distracted the driver, who happened to be texting, on a stretch of road that was slick?”


“Oh, I have something for you,” says Lance at Duke’s reclamation pond. She reaches into her backpack and hands me a cigar-sized, 3D-printed replica of the Hunley—a souvenir of sorts. It offers a micro, yet detailed, view of the sub’s interior that makes me realize how confining the crew compartment—which at full-scale was only one meter wide and 1.2 meters high—must have been for eight grown men. It was a death trap. The fact they crammed themselves into the tube anyway was a sacrifice Lance seems to have unwavering respect for. It’s part of what drove her to press on to the finish line, despite the odds being stacked against her.


But how could it be that Lance was able to unravel a century-old mystery in such a relatively short period of time, particularly given the Hunley Project’s 14-year head start? Was it beginner’s luck, or her ability to approach the problem from a different scientific vantage? Maybe it simply came down to old-fashioned determination. “You have to deal with a lot when doing this kind of research, especially when you’re doing things on your own, which can be difficult and lonely,” she says. “You need to have a lot of perseverance, because that’s where the good stuff is—past that limit where nobody’s been able to push through the problem before.”

In the end, maybe it had more to do with the fact that the Hunley Project is intent on both carrying out the painstakingly slow process of conserving the sub and explaining its disappearance. Although, from a revenue perspective, the mystery in and of itself may be a real positive for the Hunley Project and Friends of the Hunley, considering the sales of T-shirts, shot glasses, and lab tours it helps generate.

Regardless, when Lance’s findings from her blast wave experiment are published (a research paper will be released imminently), the Hunley Project team will be watching.

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#TaijiTuesday – Another Drive Hunt & Slaughter Season About to Begin

Voice For The Blue

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Just a week away, on September 1, 2017 another season of the Taiji Dolphin Drive Hunt & Slaughter will begin. Each year, from September until March, pods of dolphins make their way across Hatagiri Bay which is located near the town of Taiji in Wakayama Prefecture in Japan. While this is a scenic and even serene area at times, death haunts the infamous Cove which is located directly adjacent to Taiji’s Whale Museum.

Every year during the annual government sanctioned dolphin & whale hunt, thousands of dolphins are brutally and inhumanely slaughtered. Below is the 2017/2018 Drive Hunt Quote – Taiji Fisherman’s Union is allowed to take 1,940 dolphins from nine different species over the course of six months. Over the coming weeks Voice for the Blue will do a #TaijiTuesday blog post and introduce you the nine species of Taiji Drive Hunt Quote.

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Not all dolphins driven into the…

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Animal Emergency Preparedness for those in the path of Hurricane Harvey

Straight from the Horse's Heart

This probably isn’t your first rodeo, but we’re still going to post this for our friends in the path of floods and high winds. – Debbie

Source:  Thehorse.com

Texans Should Prepare for Flooding, High Winds from Harvey

With the probability of extensive rain and high winds throughout much of the state from the resurgence of Hurricane Harvey, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service experts are asking Texans to take measures to prepare their houses, farms, and ranches for what could come.

“We’re expecting Harvey to bring a lot of rain and flooding over a large area of the state and as he intensifies, some strong winds as well,” said Andy Vestal, MEd, PhD, AgriLife Extension specialist in emergency management, in College Station. “The storm system may also spur tornadic activity.” Vestal said people in both urban and rural areas of the state should take steps to prepare for what could come…

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U.S. erred in declining protections for remote grizzly bears: judge

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August23, 2017 / 6:22 PM / a day ago
SALMON, Idaho (Reuters) – U.S. wildlife managers erred when they declined to list as endangered a small population of grizzly bears in the remote reaches of Idaho and northwest Montana, a federal judge has ruled in what conservationists on Wednesday hailed as a huge victory.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in 2014 determined the fewer than 50 grizzlies that roam the Cabinet Mountains and Yaak River drainage in the Northern Rockies were not in danger of extinction and did not warrant re-classifying as endangered or threatened under the federal Endangered Species Act.

The Montana conservation group Alliance for the Wild Rockies sued, arguing the so-called Cabinet-Yaak population of grizzlies would go extinct unless U.S. wildlife managers tightened restrictions on logging, mining and other activities in bear habitat, all safeguards that would come with endangered status.

On Tuesday a federal judge in Missoula, Montana, sided with the conservation group in a ruling that found that the Fish and Wildlife Service had violated U.S. law in determining that the number of outsized, hump-shouldered bears in the Cabinet-Yaak ecosystem could reach a targeted recovery goal of 100 without added protections.

In the ruling, U.S. District Judge Dana Christensen found that the agency had long recognized that population of grizzlies was warranted for listing as an endangered species because of human-caused mortality and other threats.

The Fish and Wildlife Service in 2013 reported Cabinet-Yaak grizzlies were declining at an annual rate of about 0.8 percent per year and that the percentage of bears unlawfully or accidentally killed by humans had tripled by 1999-2012 compared with 1982-1998.

Yet the agency in 2014 reversed course, finding the bears did not need additional safeguards because their population trend had changed to stable from declining.

Christensen ruled that reversal was unlawfully arbitrary and capricious and ordered the Fish and Wildlife Service to rework any proposal that would downgrade the status of the bears.

Alliance head Michael Garrity on Wednesday said the judge’s decision was a victory for the grizzles.

“Now they have a chance at survival,” Garrity said.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service did not respond to a request by Reuters for comment.

Grizzlies in 1975 were listed as threatened in the lower 48 states after they neared extinction.

The Cabinet-Yaak bears are among just a handful of grizzly populations that exist outside Alaska. The grizzlies in and around Yellowstone Park, the second-largest group of bears in the Lower 48 states, were delisted this summer.

Reporting by Laura Zuckerman; Editing by Dan Whitcomb and Sandra Maler
Our Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

© 2017 Reuters. All Rights Reserved.

Piglets rescued from barn fire served to firefighters as sausages

sausage

Source: Piglets rescued from barn fire served to firefighters as sausages

Mathematical mystery of ancient Babylonian clay tablet solved

Tallbloke's Talkshop

Some Pythagorean triples [credit: Cmglee / Wikipedia]
Could Babylonian base-60 maths be about to make a comeback? The tablet has been dated to between 1822 and 1762 BC and is based on Pythagorean triples, as Phys.org reports. It uses ‘a novel kind of trigonometry based on ratios, not angles and circles’.

UNSW Sydney scientists have discovered the purpose of a famous 3700-year old Babylonian clay tablet, revealing it is the world’s oldest and most accurate trigonometric table, possibly used by ancient mathematical scribes to calculate how to construct palaces and temples and build canals.

The new research shows the Babylonians beat the Greeks to the invention of trigonometry – the study of triangles – by more than 1000 years, and reveals an ancient mathematical sophistication that had been hidden until now.

Known as Plimpton 322, the small tablet was discovered in the early 1900s in what is now…

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Nebraskans Are Building Solar Panels to Block the Keystone XL Pipeline

Mining Awareness +

From Greenpeace.org:
Nebraskans Are Building Solar Panels to Block the Keystone XL Pipeline
by Mike Hudema, August 15, 2017

“They’ll have to go under it, around it, or tear it down to get their dirty oil from Canada to the Gulf of Mexico.”

Environmentalists are sometimes criticized for not talking about solutions enough. The media often portrays people who oppose pipelines as ‘anti-development,’ for instance. The reality, however, is that we can both fight against dangerous pipelines and fight for solutions like renewable energy at the same time — and those fighting the Keystone XL tar sands pipeline just made that point more clear than ever.

Landowners and Indigenous groups are joining together to build solar projects directly in the path…

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DAPL Owner Energy Transfer Partners Uses Trump Go-To Lawyers at Kasowitz Law Firm To File Another SLAPP Lawsuit Against Greenpeace; Earth First; BankTrack and 20 Unnamed Parties

Mining Awareness +

Standing Rock Sioux Tribe Chairman Archambault Addresses UN Human Rights Commission in Geneva, 20 Sept 2016:
Standing Rock Sioux Tribe Chairman Addresses UN Human Rights Commission in Geneva, 20 Sept 2016, Indian Law Resource Center video screen shot
2 min video of speech by the [American] Indian Law Resource Center: http://youtu.be/dW0d_WsuL0Y Image from video. About the Indian Law Resource Center: http://youtu.be/YbNALv6FqUo Note that Energy Transfer Partners, the Dakota Access Pipeline owner already destroyed some burial grounds and sacred sites. See for instance: https://miningawareness.wordpress.com/2016/09/23/is-this-america-co-founder-of-sacred-stone-camp-recalls-dog-attack-on-native-americans
https://miningawareness.wordpress.com/2016/09/26/un-calls-on-us-to-halt-construction-of-dakota-access-pipeline-as-it-poses-a-significant-risk-to-the-drinking-water-of-the-standing-rock-sioux-tribe-threatens-burial-grounds-and-sacred-sites/

Trump signing Executive Order to push the construction of the Keystone XL and Dakota Access pipelines, 24 January 2017

Kasowitz, Trump, et.al. need to move to Russia where people were serfs very late and don’t have much experience with freedoms. Their SLAPP attacks on Free Speech; Freedom of the Press; Freedom of Assembly have no rightful place in the USA. Perhaps because their ancestors were late migrants from oppressed lands they don’t understand the American way. We are not serfs! Did Kasowitz, Trump, et. al. flunk Civics and…

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The Mystery of Why a Civil War Submarine Sank: Science May Have Figured It Out

Petition · Sign: Justice for Dog Allegedly Fed Meatballs Filled with Nails by Mail Carrier · Change.org


https://www.change.org/p/sign-justice-for-dog-allegedly-fed-meatballs-filled-with-nails-by-mail-carrier?source_location=petition_footer&algorithm=recommended_share&grid_position=9

Petition · Sign: Justice for Dog Found Buried Alive · Change.org


https://www.change.org/p/sign-justice-for-dog-found-buried-alive?source_location=petition_footer&algorithm=recommended_share&grid_position=11