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How The Fur Trade Made Its Big Comeback

strange behaviors

Models prepare to show fur coats and hats by designer Simonetta Ravizza. Models prepare to show fur coats and hats by Simonetta Ravizza.

by Richard Conniff/National Geographic

It was frozen-toe, mid-February, north-country cold, under a cloudless sky, sun glinting off fresh snow. We were tromping out onto a wetland frozen nine inches deep. It felt like how the fur trade began, someplace long ago, far away.

Bill Mackowski, in his 60th year of trapping, mostly around northern Maine, pointed out some alder branches sticking through the ice. Beavers start collecting poplar after the first cold snap, he explained, then pile on inedible alder to weigh down the poplar below the ice, where they eat it throughout the winter. He hacked through the ice with a metal pole, then passed it to me to try. “Feel how hard the bottom is on the run?” Beaten down by beaver traffic, he said.

Nailing the skin out to dry. (Photo: Richard Conniff) Nailing the skin out to dry. (Photo: Richard Conniff)

Breaking through…

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One comment on “How The Fur Trade Made Its Big Comeback

  1. Pingback: How The Fur Trade Made Its Big Comeback — “OUR WORLD” – ronaldwederfoort

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