Serbia: News From Felix Shelter 23/1 – Little Tak Has Passed Away.

Serbian Animals Voice (SAV)

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FELIX

Tak passing

From Danica;

It’s with utmost sorrow and profound grief that we sadly announce the passing of our gorgeous little boy Tak.

Although we knew he didn’t stand a chance against the deadliest cat virus there is, a tiny glimmer of hope persisted almost until the end. Even if only one in a million is strong and lucky enough to win this losing battle, maybe he could’ve been that one? Sadly, FIP has claimed yet another angel…

Not so long ago, Tak was a joyous and sparkling kitty boy, full of life and loved to bits. But once the first symptoms of the most feared cat disease showed up, the decline was rapid and all of his youthful vigor disappeared at a frightening rate.

Only the sparkle in his big, bright eyes remained the same until the end.

Fly free now, my little sweetie. You’ll purr forever in our hearts.

http://www.youcaring.com/pet-expenses/help-the-feline-residents-of-cat-shelter-felix/161828

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Massachusetts showers illegals with $35M in health care, meds, physical therapy

Alaskan woman jailed for helping bald eagle?

Dear Kitty. Some blog

This video from Pennsylvania in the USA is called First eaglet hatches at Pittsburgh Hays bald eagle nest 3-28-2014.

By Lisa Phu in Alaska:

Hiker who freed trapped eagle due in court today

January 22, 2015 at 5:35 am

A bald eagle was lying on the ground, each leg shut inside traps. When Juneau resident Kathleen Adair came across it scouting a trail for a group hike, the eagle was alive and looking at her. She spent an hour freeing it.

But there’s more to the story. Two and a half weeks later, Alaska Wildlife Troopers cited her for the hindrance of lawful trapping. She now faces a potential $500 fine and 30 days in jail.

On Dec. 24, Kathleen Adair was on Davies Creek Trail when she saw the eagle in her path. She’s familiar with the Juneau Raptor Center and knew the bird rescue nonprofit would…

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WOLF MEDICINE

Cheryl O'Connor - Cheoco Enterprises

Image

Wolves in general over time have been given a rather bad name and many fear them, simply because they do not understand them and I doubt our perception of them in stories like Little Red Riding Hood and The Three Little Pigs etc. did much to endear them to us as children.

Highly intelligent creatures and for me extremely beautiful animals they exist within a pack that has a very definite hierarchy.  Each Wolf knowing its place within that system.  Whilst this system exists there is also a certain amount of democracy to the way they function.  Just depends on the circumstances of the moment as to whether the rules are followed or freedom of choice is allowed and all know what is and isn’t appropriate behaviour and the consequences should they choose to break the rules.

They are very strong animals, extremely protective of their young, they work together – bringing…

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Yellowstone wildlife sent to slaughter; calling all buffalo warriors

Animal Blawg

10429277_10153021164260859_6998809249201624349_nKathleen Stachowski    Other Nations

Dear Americans:

You’re busy, I know. You’re busy working and playing and doing a million crazy, diverse things that Americans do in our big, crazy, diverse country. That’s just who we are, and that’s what makes us awesome.

But right now, I’m going to cherry-pick a few things we share. We’re nuts about wildlife–amiright?!? In 2011, a whopping 71.8 million of us–that was 30% of the U.S. adult population–identified as dedicated wildlife watchers in a once-every-five-years national Census survey. We spent a bundle–$54.9 billion–on wildlife watching that year.

According to the same report, 12.3 million of us visited parks and other natural areas to view wildlife (pg. 36). And in 2012, a National Parks Conservation Association poll found that “95 percent of voters see protecting and supporting the National Parks as an appropriate role for the federal government.” In one survey question, protecting…

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Endangered Wolves a Commodity for the Fur Fashion Industry: Trapping is made possible by wildlife agencies.

Wolves of Douglas County Wisconsin

On December 19, 2014 a judge ordered Great Lakes wolves back on the Endangered Species List. Read more on this from a previous blog here: http://wolvesofdouglascountywisconsin.com/2014/12/20/recreational-hunting-of-great-lakes-wolves-is-stopped-wolves-are-back-on-the-federal-endangered-species-list-immediately/

However, it didn’t come soon enough for the 528 wolves that lost their lives to 3 years of reckless trophy hunting in WI. The leading kill method was trapping with a total of of 242 wolves killed in the 2013 and 2013 trophy hunts.

Wolves are baited by strong scents of dead animals and then caught in a steel leg hold trap.

From WDNR Wolf Hunting Regulations on trapping: http://dnr.wi.gov/files/pdf/pubs/wm/wm0538.pdf
Methods for Trapping
Cable Restraints
It is illegal to:
• set, place or operate any cable restraint for wolves except from Dec. 1 – Feb 28, 2015.
To be a legal set, the cable restraint must:
• be 10 ft. or less in length with a diameter of 3/ 32 inch or larger and…

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Victory! UW-Madison Closes Cruel Cat Lab | PETA

Life or Lunch?

UW-madison-cat-experiment-1024x768Following an intensive PETA campaign to expose and end cruel and archaic sound-localization experiments on cats at the University of Wisconsin–Madison (UW), the federal grant money has expired, the lead experimenter has retired, and the embattled laboratory has closed its doors for good. The remaining four cats in the laboratory, including 3-year-old tabbies Rainbow and Mango, have been adopted into private homes.

Like dozens of cats before them over the past two decades, Mango and Rainbow had endured having holes drilled into their skulls, metal restraint posts screwed into their heads, and steel coils implanted in their eyes. The cats were subsequently subjected to stressful and frightening experiments during which they were restrained by the head for hours on end while they were forced to listen to sounds coming from different directions. Many suffered from recurrent infections and other painful complications.

The decision to rehabilitate and adopt out Rainbow…

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