Greenpeace co-founder says ‘no scientific proof’ humans cause climate change

Family Survival Protocol - Microcosm News

The Washington Times

By Jessica Chasmar

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Photo by: Matt Brown

**FILE** Smoke rises from the Colstrip Steam Electric Station, a coal burning power plant in in Colstrip, Mont., on July 1, 2013. Colstrip is kind of plant called on by President Barack Obama‘s climate change plan to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. On Feb. 24, 2014, the U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments on the unanimous federal appeals court ruling that upheld the Environmental Protection Agency‘s unprecedented regulations, aimed at reducing the greenhouse gases blamed for global warming. The case comes to the court amid Obama‘s increasing use of his executive authority to act on environmental and other matters when Congress doesn’t, or won’t. (Associated Press)

A co-founder of Greenpeace told a Senate panel on Tuesday that there is no scientific evidence to back claims that humans are the “dominant cause” of climate change.

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Women’s Collective in Mexico Works to Save Bee Species

spiritandanimal.wordpress.com

7 Ideas to Help Protect the Honeybee

Alex Pietrowski Activist Post With all of the immediate problems facing people these days, it is difficult to be concerned and proactive about the looming environmental crises that will affect us in big ways in the not-too-distant future. After all, who has time to do anything about radiation in the Pacific Ocean when there is still fish in the markets and you can’t find a job to pay the bills?

One of the greatest coming ecological catastrophes for the human race is the global collapse of many bee species which are largely responsible for pollinating our food crops as well as wild plants.

Without bees, human kind will suffer a terrible famine, and in some areas bees have already lost up to 90% of their colonies. Many scientists have linked the collapse of bee colonies to the overuse of…

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This amazing footage of whales and dolphins will change the way you look at drones

Grist

Drones get a bad rap, what with the killing people. Even offering to deliver our Amazon packages hasn’t really endeared them to most of us (although taco delivery did a lot to salvage drones’ reputation). But there’s nothing inherently evil about unmanned flying vehicles, and this video footage proves it.

A drone took this video, which shows an astonishing dolphin stampede followed by heartwarming footage of a mother whale with her baby. It took a human — Captain Dave Anderson of Capt. Dave’s Dolphin and Whale Safari in Dana Point, Calif. — to edit it together, but he’s giving the drones a lot of credit:

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Jack Russell travels 12 miles in car’s ENGINE

Seniors get food for pets – a good story

Heroic teens save dogs life

Critically Endangered Sumatran Tigers Trap Five Men Up Tree for Days

10 Tips for Making a Dog Feel Secure Alone at Home | Responsible Pet Ownership Blog

Tips For Financially Challenged (Or Just Frugal) Pet Owners

Dream Big, Bark Loudly

I’m young. I’m a recent graduate. And I’m unemployed. I do my best to live as frugally as I can. That includes how I take care of Lana. I aim to be, if I’m being honest, “cheap” while not sacrificing her health or happiness. I certainly don’t have a perfect system, but I’ve noticed some tricks that help me save money on pet care.

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1. I buy food in bulk. Lana gets a pretty good brand of food, but I buy 40 pounds at a time, bringing the price down to about a dollar a pound. Then I store the leftovers in airtight containers in a closet. I use a charcoal container, but I’ve seen people use tins and garbage cans.

2. I splurge on an all in one flea/tick/worm preventative. This, I also buy in bulk. Trifexis is the biggest chunk of Lana’s vet bills (normally), but I…

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Mare & Foal Sanctuary in England

Straight from the Horse's Heart

I couldn’t wait for Feel Good Sunday to post the photos below from the Mare & Foal Sanctuary in England.  Breeze, the abandoned foal, is comforted by Buttons the Teddy Bear.

Meanwhile, on this side of the pond, the BLM puts wild horse foals at risk of freezing to death at Rock Springs Corrals in Wyoming.  It seems like Ed Roberson, BLM’s Asst. Director of Resources and Planning, must have rocks in his head to allow this to happen.  And a big shout out to Joan “euthanize wild horses on the range” Guilfoyle (BLM’s Chief of the Wild Horse & Burro Program), who sits in a cozy Washington office, but has not installed shelter for the captive wild horses in freezing weather, even when Ginger Kathrens of The Cloud Foundation offered to purchase materials and have it installed at no cost to the BLM.

Anyhow, it’s good to know that there are people in the…

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Firefighters Free Dog Trapped Between Walls

Small Dog Tries to Revive His Canine Best Friend

South Korea is building a series of biodomes for endangered species

When worlds collide: Wolves in the Netherlands past-present and future

Mavadelo's mindscape

The Eurasian wolf (Canis lupus lupus), also known as the European, common or forest wolf, is a subspecies of gray wolf which has the largest range among wolf subspecies and is the most common in Europe and Asia, ranging through Mongolia, China, Russia, Scandinavia, Western Europe,Caucasus, the Himalayan Mountains and Balkans. Compared to their North American cousins, Eurasian wolves tend to have longer, more highly placed ears, narrower heads, more slender loins and coarser, tawnier coloured fur Compared to Indian wolves, Eurasian wolves are larger, and have longer, broader skulls. In Europe, wolves rarely form large packs like in North America, as their lives are more strongly influenced by human activities.Because of this, Eurasian wolves tend to be more adaptable than North American wolves in the face of human expansion.

By Malene Thyssen (Own work) [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html), CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/) or CC-BY-SA-2.5 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5)], via Wikimedia Commons

There used to be a time when the European wolf roamed freely through my country. It…

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How Much Water Do Dogs Need?

Dog Food Matters

When thinking about nutrition, most dog owners forget that water, not food, is the most important nutrient. All mammals, including humans and dogs can only last a few days without water. Within hours of water deprivation, the body begins shutting down blood flow to non-vital systems (skin, muscle, intestine, kidneys and other abdominal organs) in order to preserve water for the heart and brain. The water need of dogs is not a constant. The amount needed per day is dependent on many environmental and individual factors.

 Within hours of water deprivation, the body begins shutting down blood flow to non-vital systems

Basic Water Needs of Dogs

An easy rule of thumb is to provide at least 1-8oz. cup of water for each 10lbs. of body weight. The water bowel for every dog, Chihuahua to Great Dane, should always be larger than the food bowel. This amount of water is only a starting estimate. Individual dogs may need more water depending on their level of…

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Punish Circus for Abusing Dogs

Help Save Animals from Overheated Cars

Vegan Lynx

Sign the petition here.

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Demand an End to Inhumane Speed Tests